Complementary passive hydrotherapy WATSU (WaterShiatsu) in the rehabilitation of a severely traumatized accident survivor – A prospective case report

Schitter, Agnes M.; Fleckenstein, Johannes (2018). Complementary passive hydrotherapy WATSU (WaterShiatsu) in the rehabilitation of a severely traumatized accident survivor – A prospective case report. Complementary medicine research, 25(4), pp. 263-268. Karger 10.1159/000487768

[img] Text
Schitter_Fleckenstein 2018 CMR_WATSU_case trauma_incl suppl.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (1MB) | Request a copy
[img] Text
Schitter_Fleckenstein 2018 Case Report_Figure.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (286kB) | Request a copy
[img] Text
Schitter_Fleckenstein 2018 Case Report_Tables.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (468kB) | Request a copy

Background: WaterShiatsu (WATSU) is a passive form of hydrotherapy in warm water (35 °C) that aims at relaxation, pain relief, and a sense of security. This case report focuses on a patient's experience of integrating WATSU into her rehabilitative care. Case Report: A 52-year-old woman survived a severe motorcycle accident in which she sustained several fractures on the right side of her body, including ribs, the pelvis, and the femur. After discharge from stationary care, she independently scheduled 8 weekly WATSU sessions with an experienced WATSU therapist also trained in physiotherapy and psychosomatics. Quantitative and qualitative data obtained from the patient's diary and the therapist's notes is presented. Results: The patient associated WATSU with physical and emotional release, reconciliation with her body, and trunk mobilization (followed by ameliorated breath). She ascribed WATSU lasting effects on her body image and reported continuous improvement by the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. The therapist employed WATSU to equalize awareness throughout the body and for careful mobilization. Due to complications (elevated inflammation markers), only 6 of 8 scheduled sessions were administered. Conclusions: WATSU was experienced as helpful in approaching a condition that the patient felt insufficiently covered by conventional physiotherapy alone. In early rehabilitation, additional medical/physiotherapeutic skills of contributing complementary therapists are advocated.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of Complementary and Integrative Medicine (IKIM)

UniBE Contributor:

Schitter, Agnes Maria and Fleckenstein, Johannes

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2504-2092

Publisher:

Karger

Language:

English

Submitter:

Agnes Maria Schitter

Date Deposited:

10 Dec 2018 14:50

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 23:45

Publisher DOI:

10.1159/000487768

Related URLs:

PubMed ID:

29758556

Additional Information:

Videos and Supplementary Material to this publication are listed under 'Related Links' labelled as 'Publication'.

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Hip fractures Pelvis Mind-body therapies Pain management Stress disorders, post-traumatic Psychosomatic medicine Aquatic therapy Aquatic bodywork Relaxation

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.122158

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/122158

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback