Intestinal glucose absorption but not endogenous glucose production differs between colostrum- and formula-fed neonatal calves

Steinhoff-Wagner, J.; Gors, S.; Junghans, P.; Bruckmaier, R.M.; Kanitz, E.; Metges, C.C.; Hammon, H.M. (2011). Intestinal glucose absorption but not endogenous glucose production differs between colostrum- and formula-fed neonatal calves. Journal of nutrition, 141(1), pp. 48-55. Bethesda, Md.: American Society for Nutrition 10.3945/jn.110.128652

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Glucose supply markedly changes during the transition to extrauterine life. In this study, we investigated diet effects on glucose metabolism in neonatal calves. Calves were fed colostrum (C; n = 7) or milk-based formula (F; n = 7) with similar nutrient content up to d 4 of life. Blood plasma samples were taken daily before feeding and 2 h after feeding on d 4 to measure glucose, lactate, nonesterified fatty acids, protein, urea, insulin, glucagon, and cortisol concentrations. On d 2, additional blood samples were taken to measure glucose first-pass uptake (FPU) and turnover by oral [U-(13)C]-glucose and i.v. [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose infusion. On d 3, endogenous glucose production and gluconeogenesis were determined by i.v. [U-(13)C]-glucose and oral deuterated water administration after overnight feed deprivation. Liver tissue was obtained 2 h after feeding on d 4 and glycogen concentration and activities and mRNA abundance of gluconeogenic enzymes were measured. Plasma glucose and protein concentrations and hepatic glycogen concentration were higher (P < 0.05), whereas plasma urea, glucagon, and cortisol (d 2) concentrations as well as hepatic pyruvate carboxylase mRNA level and activity were lower (P < 0.05) in group C than in group F. Orally administered [U-(13)C]-glucose in blood was higher (P < 0.05) but FPU tended to be lower (P < 0.1) in group C than in group F. The improved glucose status in group C resulted from enhanced oral glucose absorption. Metabolic and endocrine changes pointed to elevated amino acid degradation in group F, presumably to provide substrates to meet energy requirements and to compensate for impaired oral glucose uptake.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Physiology

UniBE Contributor:

Bruckmaier, Rupert

ISSN:

0022-3166

Publisher:

American Society for Nutrition

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:32

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2014 15:05

Publisher DOI:

10.3945/jn.110.128652

Web of Science ID:

000285893900009

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/12249 (FactScience: 218563)

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