The International Tree-Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) revisited: Data availability and global ecological representativity

Zhao, Shoudong; Pederson, Neil; D'Orangeville, Loïc; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Boose, Emery; Penone, Caterina; Bauer, Bruce; Jiang, Yuan; Manzanedo, Rubén D. (2019). The International Tree-Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) revisited: Data availability and global ecological representativity. Journal of Biogeography, 46(2), pp. 355-368. Blackwell Scientific Publications 10.1111/jbi.13488

[img] Text
2019_JBiogeogr_46_355.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (3MB) | Request a copy

Aim: The International Tree‐Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) is the most comprehensive database of tree growth. To evaluate its usefulness and improve its accessibility to the broad scientific community, we aimed to: (a) quantify its biases, (b) assess how well it represents global forests, (c) develop tools to identify priority areas to improve its representativity, and d) make available the corrected database. Location: Worldwide. Time period: Contributed datasets between 1974 and 2017. Major taxa studied: Trees. Methods: We identified and corrected formatting issues in all individual datasets of the ITRDB. We then calculated the representativity of the ITRDB with respect to species, spatial coverage, climatic regions, elevations, need for data update, climatic limitations on growth, vascular plant diversity, and associated animal diversity. We combined these metrics into a global Priority Sampling Index (PSI) to highlight ways to improve ITRDB representativity. Results: Our refined dataset provides access to a network of >52 million growth data points worldwide. We found, however, that the database is dominated by trees from forests with low diversity, in semi‐arid climates, coniferous species, and in western North America. Conifers represented 81% of the ITRDB and even in well‐sampled areas, broadleaves were poorly represented. Our PSI stressed the need to increase the database diversity in terms of broadleaf species and identified poorly represented regions that require scientific attention. Great gains will be made by increasing research and data sharing in African, Asian, and South American forests. Main conclusions: The extensive data and coverage of the ITRDB show great promise to address macroecological questions. To achieve this, however, we have to overcome the significant gaps in the representativity of the ITRDB. A strategic and organized group effort is required, and we hope the tools and data provided here can guide the efforts to improve this invaluable database.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS) > Plant Ecology
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Plant Sciences (IPS)

UniBE Contributor:

Penone, Caterina and Delgado Manzanedo, Ruben

Subjects:

500 Science > 580 Plants (Botany)

ISSN:

0305-0270

Publisher:

Blackwell Scientific Publications

Language:

English

Submitter:

Peter Alfred von Ballmoos-Haas

Date Deposited:

31 Jan 2019 09:06

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 17:47

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jbi.13488

Uncontrolled Keywords:

bias analysis, big data, data accessibility, dendrochronology, dendroecology, meta-analysis, treegrowth, tree-ring research

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.122689

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/122689

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback