Strongyloides stercoralis infection in imported and local dogs in Switzerland: from clinics to molecular genetics.

Basso, Walter; Grandt, Lisa-Maria; Magnenat, Anne-Laure Juliette; Gottstein, Bruno; Campos, Miguel (2019). Strongyloides stercoralis infection in imported and local dogs in Switzerland: from clinics to molecular genetics. Parasitology research, 118(1), pp. 255-266. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00436-018-6173-3

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Strongyloides stercoralis is a worldwide-distributed intestinal nematode affecting mainly humans and dogs. Canine strongyloidosis is generally characterised by diarrhoea, malabsorption and bronchopneumonia, and may be fatal in cases of impaired immunity. In recent years, molecular and epidemiological studies suggested that host-adapted populations of S. stercoralis with different zoonotic potential may exist. Clinical and subclinical cases of S. stercoralis infection have been increasingly diagnosed in imported (France, Belgium, Bulgaria) and locally born dogs in Switzerland, showing that this parasite is currently circulating in Europe. Three of these clinical cases will be described here. All three dogs presented severe disease, characterised by harsh diarrhoea, dehydration, vomiting, respiratory and/or neurologic signs, and needed intensive care and hospitalisation. One of these dogs was related to a Swiss breeding kennel, in which the infection was subsequently diagnosed in several other dogs. Faeces were analysed by three coproscopical methods including (i) the Baermann technique, which consistently identified the typical S. stercoralis first-stage larvae in both clinical and subclinical infections, (ii) the sedimentation-zinc chloride flotation and (iii) sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin concentration (SAFC) methods, which allowed the additional identification of parasitic females and/or eggs in two of the clinical cases. Interestingly, S. stercoralis isolated from all three independent clinical cases exhibited an identical genetic background on the nuclear 18S rDNA (fragment involving hypervariable regions I and IV) and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) loci, similar to that of zoonotic isolates from other geographical regions, and not to that of dog-adapted variants. Due to the clinical relevance and zoonotic potential of this parasite, the awareness of both diagnosticians and clinicians is strongly required.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Basso, Walter Ubaldo; Grandt, Lisa-Maria; Magnenat, Anne-Laure Juliette; Gottstein, Bruno and Campos, Miguel

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0932-0113

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Bruno Gottstein

Date Deposited:

18 Dec 2018 13:17

Last Modified:

13 Jan 2019 01:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00436-018-6173-3

PubMed ID:

30552576

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Animal transport Breeding kennel Diarrhoea Genotyping Strongyloidosis Zoonosis

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.122740

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/122740

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