Treating insect-bite hypersensitivity in horses with active vaccination against IL-5.

Fettelschoss-Gabriel, Antonia; Fettelschoss, Victoria; Thoms, Franziska; Giese, Christoph; Daniel, Michelle; Olomski, Florian; Kamarachev, Jivko; Birkmann, Katharina; Bühler, Maya; Kummer, Martin; Zeltins, Andris; Marti, Eliane; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin (2018). Treating insect-bite hypersensitivity in horses with active vaccination against IL-5. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology, 142(4), 1194-1205.e3. Elsevier 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.01.041

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BACKGROUND

Insect-bite hypersensitivity is the most common allergic dermatitis in horses. Excoriated skin lesions are typical symptoms of this seasonal and refractory chronic disease. On a cellular level, the skin lesions are characterized by massive eosinophil infiltration caused by an underlying allergic response.

OBJECTIVE

To target these cells and treat disease, we developed a therapeutic vaccine against equine IL-5 (eIL-5), the master regulator of eosinophils.

METHODS

The vaccine consisted of eIL-5 covalently linked to a virus-like particle derived from cucumber mosaic virus containing the tetanus toxoid universal T-cell epitope tt830-843 (CMV). Thirty-four Icelandic horses were recruited and immunized with 400 μg of eIL-5-CMV formulated in PBS without adjuvant (19 horses) or PBS alone (15 horses).

RESULTS

The vaccine was well tolerated and did not reveal any safety concerns but was able to induce anti-eIL-5 autoantibody titers in 17 of 19 horses. This resulted in a statistically significant reduction in clinical lesion scores when compared with previous season levels, as well as levels in placebo-treated horses. Protection required a minimal threshold of anti-eIL-5 antibodies. Clinical improvement by disease scoring showed that 47% and 21% of vaccinated horses reached 50% and 75% improvement, respectively. In the placebo group no horse reached 75% improvement, and only 13% reached 50% improvement.

CONCLUSION

Our therapeutic vaccine inducing autoantibodies against self IL-5 brings biologics to horses, is the first successful immunotherapeutic approach targeting a chronic disease in horses, and might facilitate development of a similar vaccine against IL-5 in human subjects.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Allergology

UniBE Contributor:

Bachmann, Martin

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1097-6825

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Valery Beer

Date Deposited:

31 Jan 2019 10:51

Last Modified:

13 Mar 2021 18:36

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.jaci.2018.01.041

PubMed ID:

29627082

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Allergic dermatitis eosinophils vaccination

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.122900

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/122900

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