Association of sleep problems with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors in patients with acute myocardial infarction

von Känel, Roland; Princip, Mary; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schnyder, Ulrich; Meister-Langraf, Rebecca E. (2018). Association of sleep problems with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors in patients with acute myocardial infarction. BMC cardiovascular disorders, 18(1) BioMed Central 10.1186/s12872-018-0947-5

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BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insomnia are frequent sleep problems that are associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary heart disease. The mechanisms linking poor sleep with an increased cardiovascular risk are incompletely understood. We examined whether a high risk of OSA as well as insomnia symptoms are associated with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: We assessed 190 patients (mean age 60 years, 83% men) in terms of OSA risk (STOP screening tool for the assessment of high vs. low OSA risk) and severity of insomnia symptoms (Jenkins Sleep Scale for the assessment of subjective sleep difficulties) within 48 h of an acute coronary intervention. Circulating concentrations of epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and von Willebrand factor were measured the next morning. The association of OSA risk and insomnia symptoms with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors was computed using multivariate models adjusting for demographic factors, health behaviors, somatic and psychiatric comorbidities, cardiac disease-related variables, and OSA risk in the model for insomnia symptoms, respectively, for insomnia symptoms in the model for OSA risk. RESULTS: High OSA risk was identified in 41% of patients and clinically relevant insomnia symptoms were reported by 27% of patients. Compared to those with low OSA risk, patients with high OSA risk had lower levels of epinephrine (p = 0.015), norepinephrine (p = 0.049) and cortisol (p = 0.001). More severe insomnia symptoms were associated with higher levels of fibrinogen (p = 0.037), driven by difficulties initiating sleep, and with lower levels of norepinephrine (p = 0.024), driven by difficulties maintaining sleep. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with acute myocardial infarction, sleep problems are associated with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation activity. The pattern of these relationships is not uniform for patients with a high risk of OSA and those with insomnia symptoms, and whether they contribute to adverse cardiovascular outcomes needs to be established.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Psychological and Behavioral Health

UniBE Contributor:

Znoj, Hans Jörg

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1471-2261

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Salome Irina Rahel Bötschi

Date Deposited:

30 Apr 2019 13:38

Last Modified:

30 Apr 2019 13:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s12872-018-0947-5

PubMed ID:

30463526]

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.123426

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/123426

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