Increased IL-4 and decreased regulatory cytokine production following relocation of Icelandic horses from a high to low endoparasite environment

Hamza, Eman; Torsteinsdottir, S.; Eydal, M.; Frey, Caroline; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Brcic, Marija; Wagner, B.; Wilson, A.D.; Jungi, Thomas; Marti, Eliane Isabelle (2010). Increased IL-4 and decreased regulatory cytokine production following relocation of Icelandic horses from a high to low endoparasite environment. Veterinary immunology and immunopathology, 133(1), pp. 40-50. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.vetimm.2009.07.002

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Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of Culicoides spp. IBH does not occur in Iceland where Culicoides are absent. However, following importation into continental Europe where Culicoides are present, >or=50% of Icelandic horses (1st generation) develop IBH but <or=10% of their offspring born in Europe (2nd generation) do so. Recently, we showed that PBMC from 1st generation horses produce more IL-4 than 2nd generation horses. Since helminths and allergens induce Th2 responses, we investigated whether horses domiciled in Iceland are Th2-biased, and whether this is determined by helminth infection. We compared the parasite burden and T cell responses between Icelandic horses living in Iceland or Switzerland. Horses in Iceland have higher faecal egg counts, higher tapeworm-specific IgG(T) levels and higher total serum IgE levels than horses in Switzerland. Nevertheless, horses in Iceland displayed a low proportion of IL-4-producing cells in PBMC cultures after polyclonal or parasite extracts stimulation. No IL-4-producing cells were found in PBMC from horses after stimulation by Culicoides extract. Addition of anti-IL-10 and anti-TGF-beta1 to PBMC cultures of horses in Iceland increased the proportion of IL-4-producing cells after polyclonal or parasite antigens stimulation but not stimulation with Culicoides extract. This paralleled the high levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 found in supernatants from PBMC cultures of horses in Iceland. Collectively, horses living in Iceland have a high parasite burden but low IL-4 production. This supports the hypothesis that heavy helminth infections have a suppressive effect on IL-4 production mediated by IL-10 and TGF-beta1.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Experimental Clinical Research
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Virology and Immunology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Hamza, Eman; Frey, Caroline; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Brcic, Marija; Jungi, Thomas and Marti, Eliane Isabelle

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0165-2427

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:32

Last Modified:

21 Jan 2016 15:06

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.vetimm.2009.07.002

PubMed ID:

19640590

Web of Science ID:

000273904200006

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/12376 (FactScience: 218708)

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