Craniovertebral Junction Anomalies in Small Breed Dogs with Atlantoaxial Instability: A Multicentre Case–Control Study

Waschk, Maja Alice; Vidondo, Beatriz; Carrera, Inés; Hernandez-Guerra, Angel; Moissonnier, Pierre; Plessas, Ioannis; Schmidt, Martin; Schnötzinger, Dietmar; Forterre, Franck; Precht, Maria Christina (2019). Craniovertebral Junction Anomalies in Small Breed Dogs with Atlantoaxial Instability: A Multicentre Case–Control Study. Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology, 32(1), pp. 33-44. Thieme 10.1055/s-0038-1675797

[img] Text
s-0038-1675797.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (287kB) | Request a copy

OBJECTIVE:  The main purpose of this study was to define criteria to systemically describe craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies and to report the prevalence of CVJ anomalies in small breed dogs with and without atlantoaxial instability (AAI). MATERIALS AND METHODS:  Retrospective multicentre matched case-control study evaluating magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic images of small breed dogs with and without AAI for the presence of CVJ anomalies. RESULTS:  One hundred and twenty-two dogs were enrolled (61 with and 61 without AAI). Only dogs with AAI had dens axis anomalies such as separation (n = 20) or a short-rounded conformation (n = 35). Patients with AAI were more likely to have atlantooccipital overlapping based on transection of McRae's line by the dorsal arch of the atlas (odds ratio [OR] = 5.62, p < 0.01), a transection of Wackenheim's clivus line (OR = 41.62, p < 0.01) and rostral indentation of the occipital bone (OR = 2.79, p < 0.05). Patients with AAI were less likely to have a larger clivus canal angle (OR = 0.94, p < 0.01) and larger occipital bone lengths (OR = 0.89, p < 0.05). CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:  Small breed dogs with AAI are more likely to have other CVJ anomalies such as atlantooccipital overlapping or dens anomalies. The grade of brachycephaly does not differ between patients with and without AAI. Certain objective criteria from human literature were found useful for the assessment of both AAI and atlantooccipital overlapping such as McRae's line, Wackenheim's clivus line, and clivus canal angle. The classification criteria used can help to evaluate CVJ anomalies in a more systematic way.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic > Small Animal Clinic, Surgery
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > DKV - Clinical Radiology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Veterinary Public Health Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH)

UniBE Contributor:

Waschk, Maja Alice; Vidondo, Beatriz; Forterre, Franck and Precht, Maria Christina

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

0932-0814

Publisher:

Thieme

Language:

English

Submitter:

Maria Christina Precht

Date Deposited:

14 Feb 2019 07:56

Last Modified:

05 Nov 2019 08:58

Publisher DOI:

10.1055/s-0038-1675797

PubMed ID:

30485878

Uncontrolled Keywords:

atlantooccipital instability - atlantooccipital overlapping - dens axis anomalies - magnetic resonance imaging - computed tomography

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.124018

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/124018

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback