Chemokines and integrins independently tune actin flow and substrate friction during intranodal migration of T cells.

Hons, Miroslav; Kopf, Aglaja; Hauschild, Robert; Leithner, Alexander; Gaertner, Florian; Abe, Jun; Renkawitz, Jörg; Stein, Jens V; Sixt, Michael (2018). Chemokines and integrins independently tune actin flow and substrate friction during intranodal migration of T cells. Nature immunology, 19(6), pp. 606-616. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41590-018-0109-z

[img] Text
s41590-018-0109-z.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (7MB) | Request a copy

Although much is known about the physiological framework of T cell motility, and numerous rate-limiting molecules have been identified through loss-of-function approaches, an integrated functional concept of T cell motility is lacking. Here, we used in vivo precision morphometry together with analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics in vitro to deconstruct the basic mechanisms of T cell migration within lymphatic organs. We show that the contributions of the integrin LFA-1 and the chemokine receptor CCR7 are complementary rather than positioned in a linear pathway, as they are during leukocyte extravasation from the blood vasculature. Our data demonstrate that CCR7 controls cortical actin flows, whereas integrins mediate substrate friction that is sufficient to drive locomotion in the absence of considerable surface adhesions and plasma membrane flux.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Theodor Kocher Institute

Graduate School:

Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences (GCB)

UniBE Contributor:

Abe, Jun

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1529-2908

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Ursula Zingg-Zünd

Date Deposited:

27 Feb 2019 12:09

Last Modified:

04 Dec 2019 21:46

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41590-018-0109-z

PubMed ID:

29777221

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.124294

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/124294

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback