Sleep and Tibialis Anterior Muscle Activity in Mice With Mild Hypoxia and Iron Deficiency: Implications for the Restless Legs Syndrome

Lo Martire, V.; Alvente, S.; Bastianini, S.; Berteotti, C.; Valli, A.; Manconi, Mauro; Zoccoli, G.; Silvani, A. (2018). Sleep and Tibialis Anterior Muscle Activity in Mice With Mild Hypoxia and Iron Deficiency: Implications for the Restless Legs Syndrome. Frontiers in physiology, 9(1818), p. 1818. Frontiers Research Foundation 10.3389/fphys.2018.01818

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Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder that entails an urge to move with a circadian pattern during the evening/night. RLS may be accompanied by decreased sleep time and increased occurrence of periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS), which involve bursts of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle electromyogram (EMG). Mild hypoxia and non-anemic iron deficiency, a highly prevalent nutritional deficiency, are relatively unexplored factors in RLS pathophysiology. We tested whether mice exposed to mild hypoxia, alone or in combination with non-anemic iron deficiency, show decreased sleep time particularly in the light (rest) period and increased occurrence of TA EMG phasic events similar to human PLMS. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed diets with low or normal iron for 6 months from weaning and instrumented with electrodes to record the electroencephalogram and the EMG of both TA muscles. Mice were recorded in a whole-body plethysmograph while breathing a normoxic or mildly hypoxic (15 O2) gas mixture for 48 h. Hypoxia increased minute ventilation during sleep. The low-iron diet decreased liver and serum iron, leaving blood hemoglobin and brainstem iron levels unaffected. Hypoxia, either alone or in combination with non-anemic iron deficiency, decreased non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep time, but this occurred irrespective of the light/dark period and was not associated with increased occurrence of TA EMG events during non-REM sleep. These results do not support the hypothesis that mild hypoxia is sufficient to cause signs of RLS, either alone or in combination with non-anemic iron deficiency, pointing to the necessity of further susceptibility factors.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology

UniBE Contributor:

Manconi, Mauro

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1664-042X

Publisher:

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Panagiota Milona

Date Deposited:

28 Jan 2019 16:30

Last Modified:

28 Oct 2019 20:42

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fphys.2018.01818

PubMed ID:

30618828

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Willis-Ekbom disease circadian hypoxia iron mice periodic leg movements during sleep restless legs syndrome sleep

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.124726

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/124726

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