Post-stroke insomnia in community-dwelling patients with chronic motor stroke: Physiological evidence and implications for stroke care

Sterr, A; Kuhn, M; Nissen, Christoph; Ettine, D; Funk, S; Feige, B; Umarova, Roza; Urbach, H; Weiller, C; Riemann, D (2018). Post-stroke insomnia in community-dwelling patients with chronic motor stroke: Physiological evidence and implications for stroke care. Scientific Reports, 8(1), p. 8409. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41598-018-26630-y

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Questionnaire studies suggest that stroke patients experience sustained problems with sleep and daytime sleepiness, but physiological sleep studies focussing specifically on the chronic phase of stroke are lacking. Here we report for the first time physiological data of sleep and daytime sleepiness obtained through the two gold-standard methods, nocturnal polysomnography and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Data from community-dwelling patients with chronic right-hemispheric stroke (>12 months) were compared to sex- and age-matched controls. Behavioural and physiological measures suggested that stroke patients had poorer sleep with longer sleep latencies and lower sleep efficiency. Patients further spent more time awake during the night, and showed greater high-frequency power during nonREM sleep than controls. At the same time the Multiple Sleep Latency Test revealed greater wake efficiency in patients than controls. Importantly these findings were not due to group differences in sleep disordered breathing or periodic limb movements. Post-stroke insomnia is presently not adequately addressed within the care pathway for stroke. A holistic approach to rehabilitation and care provision, that includes targeted sleep interventions, is likely to enhance long-term outcome and quality of live in those living with chronic deficits after stroke.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Head Organs and Neurology (DKNS) > Clinic of Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

UniBE Contributor:

Nissen, Christoph and Umarova, Roza

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Panagiota Milona

Date Deposited:

29 Mar 2019 13:42

Last Modified:

31 Oct 2019 09:37

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41598-018-26630-y

PubMed ID:

29849087

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.125042

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/125042

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