Detection of pulsed blood flow through a molar pulp chamber and surrounding tissue in vitro.

Knörzer, S; Hiller, K-A; Brandt, M; Niklas, A; Putzger, J; Monkman, G J; Danilov, S N; Ganichev, S D; Schulz, I; Schmalz, Gottfried Hans (2019). Detection of pulsed blood flow through a molar pulp chamber and surrounding tissue in vitro. Clinical oral investigations, 23(3), pp. 1121-1132. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00784-018-2530-y

[img] Text
Knörzer2018_Article_DetectionOfPulsedBloodFlowThro.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only until 1 July 2022.
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (4MB) | Request a copy
[img]
Preview
Text
Knoerzer S - Publikation 27 Clin Oral Inv COmm GS CLEAN BORIS-1.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (219kB) | Preview

OBJECTIVES Due to severe limitations of dental pulp sensitivity tests, the direct recording of pulsed blood flow, using photoplethysmography (PPG), has been proposed. In vivo evaluation is methodologically difficult and in vitro models have hitherto been adversely influenced by shortcomings in emulating the in vivo situation. Consequently, the aim of this study was to test an improved data acquisition system and to use this configuration for recording pulsed blood in a new model. MATERIALS AND METHODS We introduced a PPG signal detection system by recording signals under different blood flow conditions at two wavelengths (625 and 940 nm). Pulsed blood flow signals were measured using an in vitro model, containing a molar with a glass pulp and a resin socket, which closely resembled in vivo conditions with regard to volumetric blood flow, pulp anatomy, and surrounding tissue. RESULTS The detection system showed improved signal strength without stronger blanketing of noise. On the tooth surface, it was possible to detect signals emanating from pulsed blood flow from the glass pulp and from surrounding tissue at 625 nm. At 940 nm, pulp derived signals were recorded, without interference signals from surrounding tissue. CONCLUSION The PPG-based method has the potential to detect pulsed blood flow in small volumes in the pulp and (at 625 nm) also in adjacent tissues. CLINICAL RELEVANCE The results show the need for clear differentiation of the spatial origins of blood flow signals of any vitality test method to be applied to teeth.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Periodontics Research

UniBE Contributor:

Schmalz, Gottfried Hans

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1432-6981

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Burri

Date Deposited:

25 Jun 2019 10:19

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 20:36

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00784-018-2530-y

PubMed ID:

29959598

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Dental pulp tests Laser Doppler flowmetry Photoplethysmography Pulp vitality Pulpal blood flow

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.125346

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/125346

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback