Noise in the Operating Room Distracts Members of the Surgical Team. An Observational Study.

Keller, Sandra; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K.; Holzer, Eliane; Candinas, Daniel; Brink, Mark; Beldi, Guido (2018). Noise in the Operating Room Distracts Members of the Surgical Team. An Observational Study. World journal of surgery, 42(12), pp. 3880-3887. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00268-018-4730-7

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BACKGROUND: Noise pollution in operation rooms may distract the surgical team members. In particular during phases of high task complexity, noise can jeopardize concentration. Phases of high complexity are related to task specificities and may thus be different for different members of the surgical team. STUDY DESIGN: Noise exposure was measured during 110 open abdominal surgeries. Distinguishing three phases (opening, main phase, and closing), noise was related to self-report of distraction levels by main and secondary surgeons, scrub nurses and anesthetists. RESULTS: Noise pollution was higher than recommended levels for concentrated work. Adjusted for duration, surgical type, and difficulty of the surgery, results showed that second surgeons are more likely distracted when noise pollution was high in the main phase; and anesthetists are more likely distracted when noise pollution was high during the closing phase. Main surgeons' and scrub nurses' concentration was not impaired by measured noise levels. CONCLUSIONS: In phases with higher concentration demands, noise pollution was particularly distracting for second surgeons and anesthetist, corresponding to their specific task demands (anesthetists) and experience (second surgeons). Reducing noise levels particularly in the main and closing phase of the surgery may reduce concentration impairments.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Visceral Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Viszeralchirurgie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Viszeralchirurgie

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Work and Organisational Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Semmer-Tschan, Norbert; Candinas, Daniel and Beldi, Guido

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

0364-2313

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Lilian Karin Smith-Wirth

Date Deposited:

11 Apr 2019 08:01

Last Modified:

11 Apr 2019 08:01

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00268-018-4730-7

PubMed ID:

29978246

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.125769

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/125769

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