The interrelationship between schizotypy, clinical high risk for psychosis and related symptoms: Cognitive disturbances matter

Flückiger, Rahel; Michel, Chantal; Grant, Phillip; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Vogeley, Kai; Hubl, Daniela; Schimmelmann, Benno G.; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Schmidt, Stefanie Julia; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke (2019). The interrelationship between schizotypy, clinical high risk for psychosis and related symptoms: Cognitive disturbances matter. Schizophrenia Research, 210, pp. 188-196. Elsevier 10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.039

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Schizotypy and clinical high risk (CHR) criteria can identify individuals who are at increased risk for developing psychosis in community and patient samples. However, both approaches have rarely been combined, and very little is known about their associations. Therefore, we examined the factorial structure of CHR and related symptoms and schizotypy features as well as their interrelationship for the first time in a comprehensive approach. In a sample of 277 patients (22 ± 6 years) from two early detection services, structural equation modeling including confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test a theory-driven model using four Wisconsin Schizotypy Scales, 14 predictive basic symptoms (BS) of the Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument, and positive, negative, and disorganized symptoms from the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes. The data fitted well to the six hypothesized latent factors consisting of negative schizotypy, positive schizotypy including perceptual BS, negative symptoms, positive symptoms, disorganized symptoms and cognitive disturbances. As postulated, schizotypy features were significantly associated with positive, negative and disorganized symptoms through cognitive disturbances. Additionally, positive and negative schizotypy also had a direct association with the respective symptom-domain. While the identified factorial structure corresponds well to dimensional models of schizotypy and psychoses, our model extends earlier models by indicating that schizotypy features are associated with positive, negative and disorganized symptoms directly or indirectly via subjective cognitive disturbances. This calls for more attention to subjective cognitive deficits in combination with heightened schizotypy in the early detection and intervention of psychoses – or even of an Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Translational Research Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Flückiger, Rahel; Michel, Chantal; Hubl, Daniela; Schimmelmann, Benno Karl Edgar; Schmidt, Stefanie Julia and Schultze-Lutter, Frauke

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology

ISSN:

0920-9964

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Michel

Date Deposited:

08 Apr 2019 17:36

Last Modified:

13 Aug 2019 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.schres.2018.12.039

PubMed ID:

30683524

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/125833

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