Do late preterm twins face an increased neonatal morbidity compared with singletons?

Zdanowicz, Jarmila Anna; Sommer, Eliane; Raio, Luigi; Nelle, Mathias; Gerull, Roland (2018). Do late preterm twins face an increased neonatal morbidity compared with singletons? Swiss medical weekly, 148, w14581. EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag 10.4414/smw.2018.14581

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OBJECTIVE Late preterm infants (born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation) have been shown to have a higher morbidity and mortality than term infants. Furthermore, twins, both term and preterm, have a higher neonatal morbidity than singletons. The aim of our study was to examine if late preterm twins consequently have twice the neonatal morbidity when both risk factors prematurity and multiple pregnancy are present. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective single-centre study was conducted to compare neonatal outcome of late preterm singletons and late preterm twins born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation as well as term twins with a gestational age from 37 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks. Primary outcome was length of hospitalisation. Secondary outcome was neonatal morbidity. RESULTS A total of 845 infants were included. Late preterm twins (n = 243) were hospitalised significantly longer than term twins (n = 107) (13.5 ± 8.0 vs 6.29 ± 2.0 days, p <0.001) and late preterm singletons (n = 495) (13.5 ± 8.0 vs 12.6 ± 8.6 days, p = 0.011). Hyperbilirubinaemia occurred significantly more often in late preterm singletons than in late preterm twins (49.7 vs 29.2%; p<0.001). Otherwise, no significant differences were detected regarding neonatal morbidities or mortality of late preterm singletons and late preterm twins. Late preterm twins had a significantly higher incidence of most morbidities than term twins. CONCLUSION Late preterm twins are hospitalised significantly longer than similar-aged singletons, but have otherwise similar neonatal morbidities. Hyperbilirubinaemia is less frequent in late preterm twins than late preterm singletons.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Zdanowicz, Jarmila Anna; Raio, Luigi; Nelle, Mathias and Gerull, Roland

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1424-7860

Publisher:

EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Monika Zehr

Date Deposited:

07 Mar 2019 10:56

Last Modified:

17 Mar 2019 02:38

Publisher DOI:

10.4414/smw.2018.14581

PubMed ID:

29376553

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.126043

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/126043

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