Lower back pain in nurses working in home care: linked to work–family conflict, emotional dissonance, and appreciation?

Elfering, Achim; Häfliger, Evelyne; Celik, Zehra; Grebner, Simone (2018). Lower back pain in nurses working in home care: linked to work–family conflict, emotional dissonance, and appreciation? Psychology, health & medicine, 23(6), pp. 733-740. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group 10.1080/13548506.2017.1417614

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In industrial countries home care services for elderly people living in the community are growing rapidly. Home care nursing is intensive and the nurses often suffer from musculoskeletal pain. Time pressure and job control are job-related factors linked to the risk of experiencing lower back pain (LBP) and LBP-related work impairment. This survey investigated whether work-family conflict (WFC), emotional dissonance and being appreciated at work have incremental predictive value. Responses were obtained from 125 home care nurses (63% response rate). Multiple linear regression showed that emotional dissonance and being appreciated at work predicted LBP intensity and LBP-related disability independently of time pressure and job control. WFC was not a predictor of LBP-related disability in multiple regression analyses despite a zero-order correlation with it. Redesigning the working pattern of home care nurses to reduce the emotional demands and improve appreciation of their work might reduce the incidence of LBP in this group.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Work and Organisational Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Elfering, Achim and Grebner, Simone Irmgard

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

1354-8506

Publisher:

Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Christine Soltermann

Date Deposited:

20 Sep 2019 15:50

Last Modified:

20 Sep 2019 15:50

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/13548506.2017.1417614

PubMed ID:

29250995

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/126636

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