The Incremental Utility of Career Adaptability in Predicting Subjective Career Success

Hänggli, Madeleine; Hirschi, Andreas (7 September 2018). The Incremental Utility of Career Adaptability in Predicting Subjective Career Success (Unpublished). In: 13th European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference. Lisbon, Portugal. 05.09.-07.09.2018.

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Now more than ever, individuals are faced with a constantly changing work environment which is a result of job structuring, technological advancements, and globalization. These changes have made careers less structured and predictable and people need to take increasing responsibility for their own career development. As a consequence, self-directed and individually customized career paths have gained importance and individual career resources (e.g. career adaptability) are becoming more and more relevant for successful and satisfying career development, especially for attaining subjective career success. Although research regarding both career adaptability and other relevant career resources increased over the last years, it is not clear how career adaptability resources are related to other career resources and more general key resources. Moreover, the relative importance of career adaptability resources compared to other career resources for the attainment of subjective career success remains unexamined. In our paper, we extend current career adaptability research by investigating the relative importance and incremental utility of career adaptability compared to other types of resources (e.g. career and key resources). Specifically, the main aims of the present paper are first, to examine the relationship of career adaptability resources to other types of career and key resources and (i.e., self-esteem and optimism) and second, to examine the relative importance and incremental utility of career adaptability resources compared to other types of career resources in relation to subjective career success (e.g. recognition, meaningful work, personal life). To address these issues, we conducted a time-lagged study with 574 employees working in private industry and found support for the notion that the key resources of optimism and self-esteem are meaningfully related to career adaptability and a range of career resources. The results also demonstrate that career adaptability should be conceptualized with a larger network of resources that are relevant for attaining subjective career success. As our study shows, career adaptability is significantly related to other types of career resources but career adaptability resources, knowledge and skills career resources, motivational career resources, and environmental career resources each explain unique variance in subjective career success. However, the conducted relative weight analyses suggest that especially motivational and environmental career resources might be more important to attain subjective career success compared to the psycho-social career adaptability resources. Overall, the study contributes to a better understanding of the specific role of the career adaptability resources for subjective career success within a larger nomological net of resources. The findings help to better position career adaptability within a more general resources framework, including offering a better understanding of the unique contribution of career adaptability resources beyond other types of resources.

Item Type:

Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Work and Organisational Psychology

UniBE Contributor:

Hänggli, Madeleine and Hirschi, Andreas

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

Language:

English

Submitter:

Madeleine Haenggli

Date Deposited:

27 May 2019 15:05

Last Modified:

27 May 2019 15:05

Additional Information:

Titel im Programm: Predicting Subjective Career Success Using Career Resources

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/126731

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