Land Degradation Neutrality - Potentials for its operationalisation at multi-levels in Nigeria

Ifejika Speranza, Chinwe; Adenle, Ademola Andrew; Boillat, Sébastien (2019). Land Degradation Neutrality - Potentials for its operationalisation at multi-levels in Nigeria. Environmental science & policy, 94, pp. 63-71. Elsevier 10.1016/j.envsci.2018.12.018

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This paper examines the operability of the Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) concept in a developing country context illustrated with the case of Nigeria, a country highly ranked as undergoing biomass degradation. While LDN offers an approach to monitor land degradation, through net-gain in land cover, land productivity and soil organic carbon, its operationalisation poses methodological, implementation and governance challenges. Based on a review of literature, available spatial datasets and the analysis of national policies, we examine the dynamics of land degradation and the prospects of LDN in Nigeria. We identify land pollution and gully erosion as further relevant indicators for LDN in the Nigerian context. We found that current institutional arrangements are largely unconducive and incoherent for operationalising LDN. Despite Nigeria’s international commitments, current national policies with relevance to LDN are vague and fragmented, based on several old laws, and have important gaps for monitoring due to inadequate data, skills and expertise, inadequate coordination, and the lack of national LDN baselines. The limited power of the national environmental agency and the lack of political will to change this situation compound the challenges. However, two promising entry points for operationalising LDN include incentivising and monitoring Sustainable Land Management practices (SLM) of local resource users according to agro-ecological zones, and mainstreaming SLM into initiatives in its agriculture and environment sectors. These insights can inform the operationalisation of LDN in other African countries.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography > Unit Sustainable Land Management
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Integrative Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Ifejika Speranza, Chinwe; Adenle, Ademola Andrew and Boillat, Sébastien

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 330 Economics
900 History > 910 Geography & travel

ISSN:

1462-9011

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Evi Nina Rothenbühler

Date Deposited:

23 Apr 2019 08:48

Last Modified:

23 Apr 2019 08:48

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.envsci.2018.12.018

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.127358

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/127358

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