Viewing men's faces does not lead to accurate predictions of trustworthiness

Efferson, Charles; Vogt, Sonja (2013). Viewing men's faces does not lead to accurate predictions of trustworthiness. Scientific Reports, 3(1047), pp. 1-7. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/srep01047

[img]
Preview
Text
Viewing men's faces does not lead to accurate predictions of trustworthiness .pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works (CC-BY-NC-ND).

Download (342kB) | Preview

The evolution of cooperation requires some mechanism that reduces the risk of exploitation for cooperative individuals. Recent studies have shown that men with wide faces are anti-social, and they are perceived that way by others. This suggests that people could use facial width to identify anti-social men and thus limit the risk of exploitation. To see if people can make accurate inferences like this, we conducted a two-part experiment. First, males played a sequential social dilemma, and we took photographs of their faces. Second, raters then viewed these photographs and guessed how second movers behaved. Raters achieved significant accuracy by guessing that second movers exhibited reciprocal behaviour. Raters were not able to use the photographs to further improve accuracy. Indeed, some raters used the photographs to their detriment; they could have potentially achieved greater accuracy and earned more money by ignoring the photographs and assuming all second movers reciprocate.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

03 Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences > Social Sciences > Institute of Sociology

UniBE Contributor:

Vogt, Sonja Brigitte

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Simona Richard

Date Deposited:

06 Aug 2019 15:12

Last Modified:

22 Oct 2019 22:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/srep01047

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.128586

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/128586

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback