The formation of Jupiter by hybrid pebble–planetesimal accretion

Alibert, Yann; Venturini, Julia; Helled, Ravit; Ataiee, Sareh; Burn, Remo; Senecal, Luc Michel Loïc; Benz, Willy; Mayer, Lucio; Mordasini, Christoph; Quanz, Sascha P.; Schönbächler, Maria (2018). The formation of Jupiter by hybrid pebble–planetesimal accretion. Nature astronomy, 2(11), pp. 873-877. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41550-018-0557-2

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The standard model for giant planet formation is based on the accretion of solids by a growing planetary embryo, followed by rapid gas accretion once the planet exceeds a so-called critical mass. The dominant size of the accreted solids (cm-size particles named pebbles or km to hundred km-size bodies named planetesimals) is, however, unknown. Recently, high-precision measurements of isotopes in meteorites provided evidence for the existence of two reservoirs in the early Solar System. These reservoirs remained separated from ~1 until ~ 3 Myr after the beginning of the Solar System's formation. This separation is interpreted as resulting from Jupiter growing and becoming a barrier for material transport. In this framework, Jupiter reached ~20 Earth masses within ~1 Myr and slowly grew to ~50 Earth masses in the subsequent 2 Myr before reaching its present-day mass. The evidence that Jupiter slowed down its growth after reaching 20 Earth masses for at least 2 Myr is puzzling because a planet of this mass is expected to trigger fast runaway gas accretion. Here, we use theoretical models to describe the conditions allowing for such a slow accretion and show that Jupiter grew in three distinct phases. First, rapid pebble accretion brought the major part of Jupiter's core mass. Second, slow planetesimal accretion provided the energy required to hinder runaway gas accretion during 2 Myr. Third, runaway gas accretion proceeded. Both pebbles and planetesimals therefore have an important role in Jupiter's formation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute
08 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute > Space Research and Planetary Sciences > Theoretical Astrophysics and Planetary Science (TAPS)
08 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute > Space Research and Planetary Sciences
08 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute > NCCR PlanetS

UniBE Contributor:

Alibert, Yann; Ataiee, Sareh; Burn, Remo; Senecal, Luc Michel Loïc; Benz, Willy and Mordasini, Christoph

Subjects:

500 Science > 530 Physics
500 Science
500 Science > 520 Astronomy
600 Technology > 620 Engineering

ISSN:

2397-3366

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Janine Jungo

Date Deposited:

13 Jun 2019 14:15

Last Modified:

13 Jun 2019 14:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41550-018-0557-2

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.128724

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/128724

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