Medical patients’ affective well-being after emergency department admission: The role of personal and social resources and health-related variables

Faessler, Lukas; Brodbeck, Jeannette; Schuetz, Philipp; Haubitz, Sebastian; Mueller, Beat; Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina (2019). Medical patients’ affective well-being after emergency department admission: The role of personal and social resources and health-related variables. PLoS ONE, 14(3), e0212900. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0212900

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Background Medical emergency admissions are critical life events associated with considerable stress. However, research on patients’ affective well-being after emergency department (ED) admission is scarce. This study investigated the course of affective well-being of medical patients following an ED admission and examined the role of personal and social resources and health-related variables. Methods In this longitudinal survey with a sample of 229 patients with lower respiratory tract infections and cardiac diseases (taken between October 2013 and December 2014), positive and negative affect was measured at ED admission (T1) and at follow-up after 7 days (T2), and 30 days (T3). The role of personal and social resources (emotional stability, trait resilience, affect state, and social support) as well as health-related variables (self-rated health, multimorbidity, and psychological comorbidity) in patients’ affective well-being was examined by controlling for demographic characteristics using regression analyses. Results The strength of the inverse correlation between positive and negative affect decreased over time. In addition to health-related variables, higher negative affect was predicted by higher psychological comorbidity over time (T1–T3). In turn, lower positive affect was predicted by lower self-rated health (T1–T2) and higher multimorbidity (T3). In terms of personal and social resources, lower negative affect was predicted by higher emotional stability (T2), whereas higher positive affect was predicted by stronger social support (T1–T2). Conclusion Knowledge about psychosocial determinants–personal and social resources and health-related variables–of patients’ affective well-being following ED admission is essential for designing more effective routine screening and treatment.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Developmental Psychology
07 Faculty of Human Sciences > Institute of Psychology > Psychological and Behavioral Health

UniBE Contributor:

Brodbeck, Jeannette and Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina

Subjects:

100 Philosophy > 150 Psychology
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Dania Gioia Spagnuolo

Date Deposited:

19 Jun 2019 15:37

Last Modified:

19 Jun 2019 15:37

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0212900

PubMed ID:

30893347

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.129556

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/129556

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