Clinical, virological and epidemiological characterization of an outbreak of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3 in a chelonian captive breeding facility: Lessons learned and first evidence of TeHV3 vertical transmission.

Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Santoni, Lorenzo; Felici, Andrea; Maresca, Carmen; Stefanetti, Valentina; Sforna, Monica; Franciosini, Maria Pia; Casagrande Proietti, Patrizia; Origgi, Francesco (2018). Clinical, virological and epidemiological characterization of an outbreak of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3 in a chelonian captive breeding facility: Lessons learned and first evidence of TeHV3 vertical transmission. PLoS ONE, 13(5), e0197169. Public Library of Science 10.1371/journal.pone.0197169

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Testudinid herpesviruses (TeHVs) have a worldwide distribution among tortoises. However, information such as risk factors promoting the occurrence or the recrudescence of the associated disease and the mid-term sequelae of an outbreak comprising the extent and dynamic of the viral shedding have been only minimally investigated. Critical management information is also lacking or anecdotal. Furthermore, major aspects of the viral pathogenesis including the likelihood of vertical transmission of the virus are virtually unknown. The present study describes the occurrence and the management of an outbreak of Testudinid herpesvirus genotype 3 (TeHV3) in a large, private collection of chelonians. Clinical, pathological, molecular and serological characterization of the outbreak were carried out. Seventy-five percent of the infected tortoises died. Complementation of molecular and serological testing was a critical point for successful management implementations. A case-control study was performed to analyze possible risk factors associated with the infection. Furthermore, a subgroup of six asymptomatic infected tortoises was monitored for two consecutive seasons after the outbreak: all the infected tortoises were determined to be intermittent shedders, except one, which was a persistent shedder. Post-hibernation was associated with the highest number of shedders. Finally, evidence of the most likely vertical transmission of the virus was obtained for the first time.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Center for Fish and Wildlife Health (FIWI)

UniBE Contributor:

Origgi, Francesco

Subjects:

600 Technology > 630 Agriculture
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

1932-6203

Publisher:

Public Library of Science

Language:

English

Submitter:

Achim Braun Parham

Date Deposited:

21 May 2019 15:59

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 14:29

Publisher DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0197169

PubMed ID:

29746560

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.129625

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/129625

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