Novel insights into mechanisms of food allergy and allergic airway inflammation using experimental mouse models

Corazza, Nadia; Kaufmann, Thomas (2012). Novel insights into mechanisms of food allergy and allergic airway inflammation using experimental mouse models. Allergy, 67(12), pp. 1483-90. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell 10.1111/all.12065

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Over the last decades, considerable efforts have been undertaken in the development of animal models mimicking the pathogenesis of allergic diseases occurring in humans. The mouse has rapidly emerged as the animal model of choice, due to considerations of handling and costs and, importantly, due to the availability of a large and increasing arsenal of genetically modified mouse strains and molecular tools facilitating the analysis of complex disease models. Here, we review latest developments in allergy research that have arisen from in vivo experimentation in the mouse, with a focus on models of food allergy and allergic asthma, which constitute major health problems with increasing incidence in industrialized countries. We highlight recent novel findings and controversies in the field, most of which were obtained through the use of gene-deficient or germ-free mice, and discuss new potential therapeutic approaches that have emerged from animal studies and that aim at attenuating allergic reactions in human patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Further Contribution)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology > Immunopathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Service Sector > Institute of Pathology

UniBE Contributor:

Corazza, Nadia and Kaufmann, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0105-4538

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:33

Last Modified:

07 Dec 2013 13:16

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/all.12065

PubMed ID:

23106364

Web of Science ID:

000311055100003

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/12982 (FactScience: 219481)

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