Follow-up care amongst long-term childhood cancer survivors: a report from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

Rebholz, Cornelia E; von der Weid, Nicolas X; Michel, Gisela; Niggli, Felix K; Kuehni, Claudia E (2011). Follow-up care amongst long-term childhood cancer survivors: a report from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. European journal of cancer, 47(2), pp. 221-229. Amsterdam: Elsevier 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.09.017

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In the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we aimed to assess the proportion of long-term survivors attending follow-up care, to characterise attendees and to describe the health professionals involved. We sent a questionnaire to 1252 patients, of whom 985 (79%) responded, aged in average 27 years (range 20-49). Overall, 183 (19%) reported regular, 405 (41%) irregular and 394 (40%) no follow-up. For 344, severity of late effects had been classified in a previous medical examination. Only 17% and 32% of survivors with moderate and severe late effects respectively had made regular visits a decade later. Female gender, after a shorter time since diagnosis, had radiotherapy, and having suffered a relapse predicted follow-up. In the past year, 8% had seen a general practitioner only, 10% a paediatric or adult oncologist and 16% other health specialists for a cancer related problem. These findings underline the necessity to implement tailored national follow-up programmes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

UniBE Contributor:

Rebholz, Cornelia; Michel, Gisela and Kühni, Claudia

ISSN:

0959-8049

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:10

Last Modified:

14 Sep 2017 10:29

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.ejca.2010.09.017

PubMed ID:

20943372

Web of Science ID:

000286715800008

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.1304

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/1304 (FactScience: 202692)

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