Titanium stable isotope investigation of magmatic processes on the Earth and Moon

Millet, Marc-Alban; Dauphas, Nicolas; Greber, Nicolas; Burton, Kevin; Dale, Chris; Debret, Baptiste; Macpherson, Colin; Nowell, Geoffrey; Williams, Helen (2016). Titanium stable isotope investigation of magmatic processes on the Earth and Moon. Earth and planetary science letters, 449, pp. 197-205. Elsevier 10.1016/j.epsl.2016.05.039

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We present titanium stable isotope measurements of terrestrial magmatic samples and lunar mare basalts with the aims of constraining the composition of the lunar and terrestrial mantles and evaluating the potential of Ti stable isotopes for understanding magmatic processes. Relative to the OL–Ti isotope standard, the δ49Ti values of terrestrial samples vary from −0.05 to +0.55‰, whereas those of lunar mare basalts vary from −0.01 to +0.03‰ (the precisions of the double spike Ti isotope measurements are ca. ±0.02‰ at 95% confidence). The Ti stable isotope compositions of differentiated terrestrial magmas define a well-defined positive correlation with SiO2 content, which appears to result from the fractional crystallisation of Ti-bearing oxides with an inferred isotope fractionation factor of ‰. Primitive terrestrial basalts show no resolvable Ti isotope variations and display similar values to mantle-derived samples (peridotite and serpentinites), indicating that partial melting does not fractionate Ti stable isotopes and that the Earth's mantle has a homogeneous δ49Ti composition of +0.005 ± 0.005 (95% c.i., ). Eclogites also display similar Ti stable isotope compositions, suggesting that Ti is immobile during dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. Lunar basalts have variable δ49Ti values; low-Ti mare basalts have δ49Ti values similar to that of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) while high-Ti lunar basalts display small enrichment in the heavy Ti isotopes. This is best interpreted in terms of source heterogeneity resulting from Ti stable isotope fractionation associated with ilmenite–melt equilibrium during the generation of the mantle source of high-Ti lunar mare basalts. The similarity in δ49Ti between terrestrial samples and low-Ti lunar basalts provides strong evidence that the Earth and Moon have identical stable Ti isotope compositions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geological Sciences

UniBE Contributor:

Greber, Nicolas

Subjects:

500 Science > 550 Earth sciences & geology

ISSN:

0012-821X

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Nicolas Greber

Date Deposited:

15 Aug 2019 11:31

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 14:41

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.epsl.2016.05.039

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.131448

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/131448

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