The Genetic Background of Mice Influences the Effects of Cigarette Smoke on Onset and Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

Enzmann, Gaby; Adelfio, Roberto; Godel, Aurélie; Haghayegh Jahromi, Neda; Tietz, Silvia; Burgener, Sabrina S.; Deutsch, Urban; Wekerle, Hartmut; Benarafa, Charaf; Engelhardt, Britta (2019). The Genetic Background of Mice Influences the Effects of Cigarette Smoke on Onset and Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis. International journal of molecular sciences, 20(6) Molecular Diversity Preservation International MDPI 10.3390/ijms20061433

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Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults leading to severe disability. Besides genetic traits, environmental factors contribute to MS pathogenesis. Cigarette smoking increases the risk of MS in an HLA-dependent fashion, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we explored the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on spontaneous and induced models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by evaluating clinical disease and, when relevant, blood leukocytes and histopathology. In the relapsing-remitting (RR) transgenic model in SJL/J mice, we observed very low incidence in both smoke-exposed and control groups. In the optico-spinal encephalomyelitis (OSE) double transgenic model in C57BL/6 mice, the early onset of EAE prevented a meaningful evaluation of the effects of cigarette smoke. In EAE models induced by immunization, daily exposure to cigarette smoke caused a delayed onset of EAE followed by a protracted disease course in SJL/J mice. In contrast, cigarette smoke exposure ameliorated the EAE clinical score in C57BL/6J mice. Our exploratory studies therefore show that genetic background influences the effects of cigarette smoke on autoimmune neuroinflammation. Importantly, our findings expose the challenge of identifying an animal model for studying the influence of cigarette smoke in MS.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Research Foci > Host-Pathogen Interaction
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Theodor Kocher Institute
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Virology and Immunology
05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP)

UniBE Contributor:

Enzmann, Gaby; Adelfio, Roberto; Godel, Aurélie; Haghayegh Jahromi, Neda; Tietz, Silvia; Deutsch, Urban and Engelhardt, Britta

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

1661-6596

Publisher:

Molecular Diversity Preservation International MDPI

Language:

English

Submitter:

Achim Braun Parham

Date Deposited:

04 Sep 2019 17:22

Last Modified:

26 Oct 2019 15:02

Publisher DOI:

10.3390/ijms20061433

PubMed ID:

30901861

Uncontrolled Keywords:

and induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis multiple sclerosis risk factor spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis tobacco smoke

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.132996

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/132996

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