Application of prothrombin complex concentrate for reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in clinical practice: indications, patient characteristics and clinical outcomes compared to reversal of vitamin K antagonists.

Müller, Martin; Eastline, Jonathan; Nagler, Michael; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.; Sauter, Thomas C. (2019). Application of prothrombin complex concentrate for reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in clinical practice: indications, patient characteristics and clinical outcomes compared to reversal of vitamin K antagonists. Scandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine, 27(1), p. 48. BioMed Central 10.1186/s13049-019-0625-3

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BACKGROUND Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) is widely used to reverse the action of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in accordance with current guidelines and because of a lack of specific reversal agents. Indications, clinical characteristics and patient outcomes of patients might differ in comparison to reversal of vitamin K antagonists where reversal with PCC is well established. METHODS Our cohort study explores patient characteristics, indications and clinical outcomes for reversal of all DOAC patients receiving PCC at our university emergency department from 01.06.2012 to 01.07.2017, in comparison with patients on VKA. RESULTS Out of 199,982 consultations, we studied 346 patients who were given PCC for reversal of either DOAC (n = 74) or VKA (n = 272). The most common reason for treatment was acute bleeding; in 86.7% of both groups. 37.3% of bleeding was traumatic (p = 0.666). The most frequent bleeding location was intracranial (61.6%, p = 0.881). Gastrointestinal bleeding was more often found in the DOAC group (18.9% vs. 8.8%, p = 0.014). More erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) were given to DOAC patients with blood transfusion (p = 0.014). Tranexamic acid was used more often in DOAC patients than in VKA patients (28.4% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.001). No significant group differences were found for the following patient outcomes: in-hospital mortality, ICU stay, and length of stay at the ICU or in hospital. CONCLUSION In DOAC treated patients, PCC was applied more often because of gastrointestinal bleeding and patients received higher numbers of ECs as well as tranexamic acid. No differences were observed with regard to important clinical outcomes.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Martin; Nagler, Michael; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis and Sauter, Thomas

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1757-7241

Publisher:

BioMed Central

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pierrette Durand Lüthi

Date Deposited:

17 Sep 2019 10:36

Last Modified:

22 Sep 2019 02:39

Publisher DOI:

10.1186/s13049-019-0625-3

PubMed ID:

31014373

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Anticoagulants Antidote Bleeding Direct oral anticoagulants Vitamin K antagonist

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133177

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133177

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