How a Catastrophic Flood of the Gürbe River Triggered the Rethinking of Local Flood Protection

Salvisberg, Melanie (19 August 2019). How a Catastrophic Flood of the Gürbe River Triggered the Rethinking of Local Flood Protection. Arcadia: explorations in environmental history, 2019(27) Rachel Carson Center 10.5282/rcc/8762

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The Gürbe Valley, located south of Bern, is very prone to floods due to the hydrological and geological framework conditions. In the mid-19th century, the lower course of the Gürbe River was channelized and the upper reach was consolidated by a large torrent control. Even though these measures amended the situation, landslides and floods continued to cause damage. The hydraulic structures were therefore continuously expanded. In the second half of the 20th century, the flood protection philosophy began to change, but the new principles – renaturations and passive measures instead of hard engineering – were only (partly) realized after the catastrophic flood of 1990.

Item Type:

Newspaper or Magazine Article

Division/Institute:

10 Strategic Research Centers > Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research (OCCR)
06 Faculty of Humanities > Department of History and Archaeology > Institute of History > Economic, Social and Environmental History

UniBE Contributor:

Salvisberg, Melanie

Subjects:

900 History

ISSN:

2199-3408

Publisher:

Rachel Carson Center

Language:

English

Submitter:

Melanie Salvisberg

Date Deposited:

17 Sep 2019 14:21

Last Modified:

21 Nov 2019 04:25

Publisher DOI:

10.5282/rcc/8762

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133218

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133218

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