Swiss Delphi study on iron deficiency.

Nowak, Albina; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Betticher, Daniel; Dickenmann, Michael; Guessous, Idris; Juillerat, Pascal; Korte, Wolfang; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Pfister, Otmar; Surbek, Daniel; Battegay, Edouard; Steurer, Johann (2019). Swiss Delphi study on iron deficiency. Swiss medical weekly, 149(w20097), w20097. EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag 10.4414/smw.2019.20097

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AIMS OF THE STUDY Iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are important conditions affecting a large proportion of the general population, causing the patients physical and psychosomatic symptoms, particularly fatigue, and significantly affecting their quality of life. General practitioners (GPs) are frequently consulted with nonspecific symptoms due to the ID. However, little evidence is available to guide iron treatment. The aim of the Swiss Delphi study was to generate a broad consensual Swiss expert opinion in various therapeutic areas on diagnosis and treatment of ID/IDA and their practical implications. METHODS Specific statements regarding clinical relevance, practical diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and treatment were evaluated by Swiss experts in various therapeutic areas using the Delphi method. “Consensus” was defined as ≥80% agreement; the agreement of 50–79% was defined as “critical”, of <50% as “disagreement”. RESULTS Consensus was reached for most statements. In patients without systemic inflammation, the threshold of 30 μg/l provide a good accuracy for the diagnosis of ID without anaemia. Ferritin levels within the range 30–50 μg/l with TSAT <20% can indicate ID without anaemia. Iron replacement therapy is accepted for treatment, not only of IDA, but also of symptomatic ID without anaemia. GPs play a central role in diagnosis and management of ID. CONCLUSIONS This consensus study provides potential therapeutic strategies for management of iron deficiency and is based on opinions of a high number of contributing specialists, providing their views from a wide range of clinical perspectives. &nbsp.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Dermatology, Urology, Rheumatology, Nephrology, Osteoporosis (DURN) > Clinic of Nephrology and Hypertension
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Med. Onkologie / Hämatologie (Erw.)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Med. Onkologie / Hämatologie (Erw.)

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Haematology and Central Haematological Laboratory
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Gynaecology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Hämatologie (Erwachsene)

UniBE Contributor:

Angelillo, Anne; Betticher, Daniel; Juillerat, Pascal and Surbek, Daniel

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1424-7860

Publisher:

EMH Schweizerischer Ärzteverlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pierrette Durand Lüthi

Date Deposited:

23 Sep 2019 10:11

Last Modified:

24 Oct 2019 15:58

Publisher DOI:

10.4414/smw.2019.20097

PubMed ID:

31269223

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133381

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133381

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