Association between depressive symptoms and sleep neurophysiology in early adolescence

Hamann, Christoph; Rusterholz, Thomas; Studer, Martina; Kaess, Michael; Tarokh, Leila (2019). Association between depressive symptoms and sleep neurophysiology in early adolescence. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, 60(12), pp. 1334-1342. Wiley 10.1111/jcpp.13088

[img] Text
Hamann_et_al-2019-Journal_of_Child_Psychology_and_Psychiatry.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (542kB) | Request a copy

BACKGROUND: Depression is highly prevalent among adolescents, and depressive symptoms rise rapidly during early adolescence. Depression is often accompanied by subjective sleep complaints and alterations in sleep neurophysiology. In this study, we examine whether depressive symptoms, measured on a continuum, are associated with subjective and objective (sleep architecture and neurophysiology) measures of sleep in early adolescence. METHODS: High-density sleep EEG, actigraphy, and self-reported sleep were measured in 52 early adolescents (12.31 years; SD: 1.121; 25 female). Depressive symptoms were measured on a continuum using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The association between depressive symptoms and 2 weeks of actigraphy, self-reported sleep, sleep architecture, and sleep neurophysiology (slow wave activity and sigma power) was determined via multiple linear regression with factors age, sex, and pubertal status. RESULTS: Despite no association between polysomnography measures of sleep quality and depressive symptoms, individuals with more depressive symptoms manifested worse actigraphically measured sleep. Less sleep spindle activity, as reflected in nonrapid eye movement sleep sigma power, was associated with more depressive symptoms over a large cluster encompassing temporal, parietal, and occipital regions. Furthermore, worse subjectively reported sleep quality was also associated with less sigma power over these same areas. Puberty, age, and sex did not impact this association. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep spindles have been hypothesized to protect sleep against environmental disturbances. Thus, diminished spindle power may be a subtle sign of disrupted sleep and its association with depressive symptoms in early adolescence may signal vulnerability for depression.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Hamann, Christoph; Rusterholz, Thomas; Kaess, Michael and Tarokh, Leila

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0021-9630

Publisher:

Wiley

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Michel

Date Deposited:

01 Oct 2019 09:52

Last Modified:

15 Nov 2019 01:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1111/jcpp.13088

PubMed ID:

31512761

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133592

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133592

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback