How European primary care practitioners think the timeliness of cancer diagnosis can be improved: a thematic analysis.

Harris, Michael; Thulesius, Hans; Neves, Ana Luísa; Harker, Sophie; Koskela, Tuomas; Petek, Davorina; Hoffman, Robert; Brekke, Mette; Buczkowski, Krzysztof; Buono, Nicola; Costiug, Emiliana; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Foreva, Gergana; Jakob, Eva; Marzo-Castillejo, Mercè; Murchie, Peter; Sawicka-Powierza, Jolanta; Schneider, Antonius; Smyrnakis, Emmanouil; Streit, Sven; ... (2019). How European primary care practitioners think the timeliness of cancer diagnosis can be improved: a thematic analysis. BMJ open, 9(9), e030169. BMJ Publishing Group 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030169

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BACKGROUND National European cancer survival rates vary widely. Prolonged diagnostic intervals are thought to be a key factor in explaining these variations. Primary care practitioners (PCPs) frequently play a crucial role during initial cancer diagnosis; their knowledge could be used to improve the planning of more effective approaches to earlier cancer diagnosis. OBJECTIVES This study sought the views of PCPs from across Europe on how they thought the timeliness of cancer diagnosis could be improved. DESIGN In an online survey, a final open-ended question asked PCPs how they thought the speed of diagnosis of cancer in primary care could be improved. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. SETTING A primary care study, with participating centres in 20 European countries. PARTICIPANTS A total of 1352 PCPs answered the final survey question, with a median of 48 per country. RESULTS The main themes identified were: patient-related factors, including health education; care provider-related factors, including continuing medical education; improving communication and interprofessional partnership, particularly between primary and secondary care; factors relating to health system organisation and policies, including improving access to healthcare; easier primary care access to diagnostic tests; and use of information technology. Re-allocation of funding to support timely diagnosis was seen as an issue affecting all of these. CONCLUSIONS To achieve more timely cancer diagnosis, health systems need to facilitate earlier patient presentation through education and better access to care, have well-educated clinicians with good access to investigations and better information technology, and adequate primary care cancer diagnostic pathway funding.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Harris, Michael Frank and Streit, Sven

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

2044-6055

Publisher:

BMJ Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2019 10:09

Last Modified:

23 Oct 2019 17:10

Publisher DOI:

10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030169

PubMed ID:

31551382

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Cancer Consultation and Referral Delivery of Health Care Diagnosis General Practitioners Primary Health Care

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133697

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133697

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