All-cause and cause-specific mortality following non-traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence from a population-based cohort study in Switzerland.

Buzzell, A; Chamberlain, J D; Eriks-Hoogland, I; Hug, K; Jordan, X; Schubert, M; Zwahlen, M.; Brinkhof, M W G (2020). All-cause and cause-specific mortality following non-traumatic spinal cord injury: evidence from a population-based cohort study in Switzerland. Spinal cord, 58(2), pp. 157-164. Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41393-019-0361-6

[img]
Preview
Text
Buzzel SpinalCord 2019_epub.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (495kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Buzzel SpinalCord 2019_suppl.pdf - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (401kB) | Preview

STUDY DESIGN Observational cohort study. OBJECTIVE To benchmark all-cause and cause-specific mortality following NTSCI to the general population (GP). SETTING Specialized rehabilitation centers in Switzerland. METHODS Longitudinal data from the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury (SwiSCI) Medical Record study were probabilistically linked with cause of death (CoD) information from the Swiss National Cohort. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were estimated for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Competing risk frameworks were used to estimate the probability of death due to specific CoD. RESULTS One thousand five hundred and one individuals were admitted for first rehabilitation with NTSCI between 1990-2011; CoD information was available for 454 individuals of the 525 individuals that died. Overall, the mortality rate for persons with NTSCI was 1.6 times greater than that of the GP. Deaths due to cardiovascular disease (39.8%), neoplasms (22%), and infection (9.9%) were most often reported. Individuals with an SCI due to a vascular etiology indicated the greatest burden of mortality from infection compared with the GP (SMR 5.4; 95% CI, 3.1 to 9.2). CONCLUSIONS Cause-specific SMRs varied according to etiology. This supports the need for targeted clinical care and follow-up. Cardiovascular disease, neoplasms, and infection, emerged as main causes of death following NTSCI and should thus be targets for future research and differential clinical management approaches.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Zwahlen, Marcel

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1362-4393

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Funders:

[4] Swiss National Science Foundation

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

28 Oct 2019 14:41

Last Modified:

10 Feb 2020 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41393-019-0361-6

PubMed ID:

31591462

Additional Information:

M. Zwahlen and M.W.G. Brinkhof contributed equally to this work

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.133907

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/133907

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback