Management of growth failure and growth hormone deficiency after pediatric allogeneic HSCT: Endocrinologists are of importance for further guidelines and studies.

Lawitschka, A; Schwarze, P; Rovelli, A; Badoglio, M; Socie, G; Tichelli, A; Bauer, D; Rovó, Alicia; Basak, G; Schoemans, H; Peters, C; Salooja, N (2019). Management of growth failure and growth hormone deficiency after pediatric allogeneic HSCT: Endocrinologists are of importance for further guidelines and studies. Pediatric hematology and oncology, 36(8), pp. 494-503. Taylor & Francis 10.1080/08880018.2019.1670764

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Growth failure (GF) is a frequent problem after pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) occurs in 20 to 85%, but published data on the efficacy of growth hormone treatment (GHT) are conflicting. Currently, there are no recommendations on screening for and treatment of GHD after HSCT. We aimed to describe the management of endocrine follow-up (FU)and details of GHT within European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) centers. In a retrospective questionnaire study, all EBMT centers performing pediatric HSCT were invited. Results were evaluated in correlation with the structure of endocrine aftercare (HSCT-clinicians and endocrinologists). The majority of centers (80%) reported endocrine FU by an endocrinologist - either within the HSCT-center or in a separate endocrine clinic. Fifty-four percent reported FU outside of the HSCT-center. As diagnostic tests the insulin-like growth factor IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor binding protein IGFBP3, insulin tolerance test and arginine stimulation test were most frequently used. Sixty-four percent of centers performed GHT and endocrinologists were more likely to prescribe GH (74%) compared to HSCT-clinicians (33%). The most frequent indication for GHT was GHD in 60%, with a distinct different approach of endocrinologists in comparison with HSCT-clinicians. Our study reveals substantial variation in practice and emphasizes the need for endocrine aftercare performed by dedicated endocrinologists in close collaboration with the HSCT-center. Our results indicate that the management of GHT depends on the structure of endocrine aftercare, which is important for the future development and distribution of studies and guidelines.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Haematology, Oncology, Infectious Diseases, Laboratory Medicine and Hospital Pharmacy (DOLS) > Clinic of Haematology and Central Haematological Laboratory

UniBE Contributor:

Rovó, Alicia

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0888-0018

Publisher:

Taylor & Francis

Language:

English

Submitter:

Pierrette Durand Lüthi

Date Deposited:

13 Nov 2019 15:17

Last Modified:

23 Nov 2019 01:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1080/08880018.2019.1670764

PubMed ID:

31633441

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Pediatric endocrinology endocrinology growth hormone treatment late effects of cancer treatment long term survival

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.134373

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/134373

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