Non-vascularized partial joint transfer for Finger Proximal Interphalangeal joint reconstruction: a series of 9 patients.

Leclère, Franck M.; Haug, Luzian; Meier, Rahel; Surke, Carsten; Unglaub, Frank; Vögelin, Esther (2020). Non-vascularized partial joint transfer for Finger Proximal Interphalangeal joint reconstruction: a series of 9 patients. Archives of orthopaedic and trauma surgery, 140(1), pp. 139-144. Springer 10.1007/s00402-019-03301-9

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INTRODUCTION Finger proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) reconstruction after the destruction of parts of the joint remains challenging. Surgical techniques include implant arthroplasty, arthrodesis, free vascularized joint transfer, and non-vascularized bone and joint transfer. This study analyzes our experience after non-vascularized transfer in terms of range of motion, postoperative rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS Between 2009 and 2014, ten patients underwent non-vascularized partial joint transfer for PIP joint reconstruction. One of them was lost to follow-up. Included patients had osteochondral partial joint transplants of 25-50% of the toes (n = 4) and the hand (n = 5). Range of motion (ROM), grip-, and pinch-strength were measured at the last follow-up control and compared to the healthy side. Patients were asked to score the pain at rest/ on load on a visual scale (VAS: 0 = no pain; 10 = excruciating pain). Satisfaction self-assessment was evaluated by asking the patients to grade their postoperative result as excellent, very good, good or poor. RESULTS Mean follow-up period was 4.0 years (range 1.2-7.9 years). Mean PIP joint flexion was 93 ± 26° at the last follow-up control. Mean grip- and pinch-strength of the operated side at the last control were, respectively, 43 ± 18 kg and 8 ± 5 kg, close to the healthy side values (45 ± 15 kg and 9 ± 4 kg). Mean pain at rest/on load measured on a visual scale was, respectively, 0.3 ± 1 and 1.8 ± 2. Eight patients (89%) rated their operation as excellent, and one as poor. CONCLUSION In this study, non-vascularized partial joint transfer provides a mobile and stable PIP joint 4 years after reconstruction. The surgical technique presented herein is complex depending on additional injuries but results in great patient satisfaction.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Plastic and Hand Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Plastic and Hand Surgery > Hand Surgery

UniBE Contributor:

Leclère, Franck-Marie Patrick; Haug, Luzian Carlo Peter; Meier, Rahel; Surke, Carsten and Vögelin, Esther

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0936-8051

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Veronika Picha

Date Deposited:

20 Nov 2019 14:29

Last Modified:

06 Jan 2020 01:32

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00402-019-03301-9

PubMed ID:

31691006

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Hemi-hamate arthroplasty Joint transfer Non-vascularized transfer PIP reconstruction

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.134881

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/134881

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