Longitudinal development of risk-taking and self-injurious behavior in association with late adolescent borderline personality disorder symptoms

Ghinea, Denisa; Koenig, Julian; Parzer, Peter; Brunner, Romuald; Carli, Vladimir; Hoven, Christina W.; Sarchiapone, Marco; Wasserman, Danuta; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael (2019). Longitudinal development of risk-taking and self-injurious behavior in association with late adolescent borderline personality disorder symptoms. Psychiatry research, 273, pp. 127-133. Elsevier 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.010

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Self-injurious behavior and risk-taking behaviors are associated with adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD). Developmental trajectories of self-injurious and risk-taking behavior in predicting BPD have not been fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine self-injurious and risk-taking behavior development and their prospective influence on BPD symptoms in adolescence. Data (n = 506; 62.06 % females, 14.53 years) from the German Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe cohort were analyzed. Self-injurious and risk-taking behaviors were assessed at baseline and one-year follow-up. BPD symptoms were assessed at two-year follow-up. In fully adjusted stepwise binominal regression analyses, recent onset, termination and maintenance of risky alcohol use and self-injurious behavior remained as significant predictors of BPD. Highest ORs were found for alcohol termination and maintenance of self-injurious behavior. Other facets of risk-taking behavior were not associated with increased ORs of BPD symptoms at two-year follow-up. These findings highlight the importance of self-injurious behavior and specific facets of risk-taking behavior in the development of adolescent BPD. Clinicians should focus on efforts in preventing adolescents from risk-taking and self-injurious behavior, since engaging in young age and therefore in potentially longer periods of these behaviors is associated with the highest risk of BPD.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Psychiatric Services > University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy > Research Division

UniBE Contributor:

Koenig, Julian and Kaess, Michael

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0165-1781

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Michel

Date Deposited:

18 Dec 2019 14:26

Last Modified:

19 Dec 2019 05:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.010

PubMed ID:

30641342

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.135633

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/135633

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