Population biomonitoring of micronutrient intakes in children using urinary spot samples.

Rios-Leyvraz, Magali; Bochud, Murielle; Benzi Schmid, Clara; Haldimann, Max; Bovet, Pascal; Chiolero, Arnaud (2020). Population biomonitoring of micronutrient intakes in children using urinary spot samples. European Journal of Nutrition, 59(7), pp. 3059-3068. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00394-019-02144-9

[img] Text
Rios-Leyvraz EurJNutr 2020_p3059.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to registered users only until 20 November 2023.
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (2MB) | Request a copy
[img]
Preview
Text
Rios-Leyvraz EurJNutr 2019_postprint.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Publisher holds Copyright.

Download (118kB) | Preview

PURPOSE

Urinary spot samples are a promising method for the biomonitoring of micronutrient intake in children. Our aim was to assess whether urinary spot samples could be used to estimate the 24-h urinary excretion of potassium, phosphate, and iodine at the population level.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study of 101 children between 6 and 16 years of age was conducted. Each child collected a 24-h urine collection and three urinary spot samples (evening, overnight, and morning). Several equations were used to estimate 24-h excretion based on the urinary concentrations of each micronutrient in the three spot samples. Various equations and spot combinations were compared using several statistics and plots.

RESULTS

Ninety-four children were included in the analysis (mean age: 10.5 years). The mean measured 24-h urinary excretions of potassium, phosphate, and iodine were 1.76 g, 0.61 g, and 95 µg, respectively. For potassium, the best 24-h estimates were obtained with the Mage equation and morning spot (mean bias: 0.2 g, correlation: 0.27, precision: 56%, and misclassification: 10%). For phosphate, the best 24-h estimates were obtained with the Mage equation and overnight spot (mean bias: - 0.03 g, correlation: 0.54, precision: 72%, and misclassification: 10%). For iodine, the best 24-h estimates were obtained with the Remer equation and overnight spot (mean bias: - 8 µg, correlation: 0.58, precision: 86%, misclassification: 16%).

CONCLUSIONS

Urinary spot samples could be a good alternative to 24-h urine collection for the population biomonitoring of iodine and phosphate intakes in children. For potassium, spot samples were less reliable.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Medical Education > Institute of General Practice and Primary Care (BIHAM)

UniBE Contributor:

Chiolero, Arnaud

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1436-6207

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Kopp Heim

Date Deposited:

26 Nov 2019 09:30

Last Modified:

25 Nov 2020 12:05

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00394-019-02144-9

PubMed ID:

31745727

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Children Iodine Phosphate Potassium Urinary excretion Urinary spots

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.135691

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/135691

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback