Short-Term Clinical and Radiographical Outcome after Application of Anchored Intervertebral Spacers in Dogs with Disc-Associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

Rohner, Deborah; Kowaleski, Michael P.; Schwarz, Günter; Forterre, Franck (2019). Short-Term Clinical and Radiographical Outcome after Application of Anchored Intervertebral Spacers in Dogs with Disc-Associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy. Veterinary and comparative orthopaedics and traumatology : VCOT, 32(2), pp. 158-164. Thieme 10.1055/s-0038-1676592

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Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the short-term outcome of a new intervertebral anchored fusion device (C-LOX) for the treatment of disc associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (DA-CSM) in dogs, based on clinical and radiographical follow-up data. Materials and Methods To be included in the study, dogs had to be clinically affected by DA-CSM treated with surgical distraction/stabilization using the anchored intervertebral spacer (C-LOX). Neurological signs, as well as diagnostic imaging performed pre-, immediately postoperatively, and after 6 weeks and 3 months were assessed. If available, clinical follow-up after 3 months was documented. Results Thirty-seven cases were enrolled in the study. Outcome at 3 months was available in 25 dogs; improvement of neurological status was documented in 25/25 cases. The most common postoperative complication was screw loosening and/or breakage (n = 22), followed by subsidence (n = 15). Four dogs required revision surgery. Clinical Significance Distraction/stabilization of DA-CSM in dogs with the C-LOX device resulted in short-term clinical improvement in 33/37 treated cases. The high incidence of screw loosening was taken into consideration and modification of the implant with a new locking system and new screw dimensions was required. The C-LOX device seems to be a valuable alternative to more complicated distraction–fusion techniques.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine (DKV) > Small Animal Clinic

UniBE Contributor:

Rohner, Deborah and Forterre, Franck

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0932-0814

Publisher:

Thieme

Language:

English

Submitter:

Manuel Roland Schmidli

Date Deposited:

04 Dec 2019 10:03

Last Modified:

04 Dec 2019 10:03

Publisher DOI:

10.1055/s-0038-1676592

PubMed ID:

30736092

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.135740

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/135740

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