The coincidence of ecological opportunity with hybridization explains rapid adaptive radiation in Lake Mweru cichlid fishes

Meier, Joana I.; Stelkens, Rike B.; Joyce, Domino A.; Mwaiko, Salome; Phiri, Numel; Schliewen, Ulrich K.; Selz, Oliver M.; Wagner, Catherine E.; Katongo, Cyprian; Seehausen, Ole (2019). The coincidence of ecological opportunity with hybridization explains rapid adaptive radiation in Lake Mweru cichlid fishes. Nature communications, 10(1) Nature Publishing Group 10.1038/s41467-019-13278-z

[img]
Preview
Text
Meier et al. 2019 NC Hybridization plus eco opportunity.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Meier et al. 2019 NC Hybridization plus eco opportunity SI.pdf - Supplemental Material
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution (CC-BY).

Download (2MB) | Preview

The process of adaptive radiation was classically hypothesized to require isolation of a lineage from its source (no gene flow) and from related species (no competition). Alternatively, hybridization between species may generate genetic variation that facilitates adaptive radiation. Here we study haplochromine cichlid assemblages in two African Great Lakes to test these hypotheses. Greater biotic isolation (fewer lineages) predicts fewer constraints by competition and hence more ecological opportunity in Lake Bangweulu, whereas opportunity for hybridization predicts increased genetic potential in Lake Mweru. In Lake Bangweulu, we find no evidence for hybridization but also no adaptive radiation. We show that the Bangweulu lineages also colonized Lake Mweru, where they hybridized with Congolese lineages and then underwent multiple adaptive radiations that are strikingly complementary in ecology and morphology. Our data suggest that the presence of several related lineages does not necessarily prevent adaptive radiation, although it constrains the trajectories of morphological diversification. It might instead facilitate adaptive radiation when hybridization generates genetic variation, without which radiation may start much later, progress more slowly or never occur.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE)
08 Faculty of Science > Department of Biology > Institute of Ecology and Evolution (IEE) > Aquatic Ecology

UniBE Contributor:

Meier, Joana; Stelkens, Rike Bahati; Selz, Oliver Martin; Wagner, Catherine and Seehausen, Ole

Subjects:

500 Science > 570 Life sciences; biology

ISSN:

2041-1723

Publisher:

Nature Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Marcel Häsler

Date Deposited:

13 Dec 2019 14:37

Last Modified:

15 Dec 2019 02:45

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41467-019-13278-z

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.136200

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/136200

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback