Asthma control in children: Body plethysmography in addition to spirometry.

Korten, Insa; Zacharasiewicz, Angela; Bittkowski, Nina; Hofmann, Alexander; Lex, Christiane (2019). Asthma control in children: Body plethysmography in addition to spirometry. Pediatric pulmonology, 54(8), pp. 1141-1148. Wiley-Blackwell 10.1002/ppul.24320

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BACKGROUND There is a lack of agreement among measures of asthma control in children. In Central Europe, body plethysmography is additionally used for asthma monitoring. However, its value is still unclear. OBJECTIVES We investigated the possible additional value of body plethysmographic measures (specific resistance, residual volume-total lung capacity ratio [RV/TLC]) compared with spirometric measures forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV 1 /FVC, forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF 25-75 ), and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) for assessment of asthma control. METHODS One hundred and forty-five asthmatic children aged 5 to 17 were included. All children performed measurements of FeNO, spirometry, and body plethymography. Asthma control was assessed by the asthma control test (c-ACT/ACT) and a doctor's assessment of asthma control. RESULTS Investigating single lung function parameters, FEV1 , FEV 1 /FVC, FEF 25-75 and RV/TLC differed between controlled and partly controlled asthma. However, we found no differences between controlled and uncontrolled asthma with regard to single lung function parameters or for any parameter if investigated in a multivariable approach. This was also true if we combined obtained parameters from spirometry (comparing pathologic vs normal spirometry). Investigating the combination of body plethysmography and doctor's assessment of asthma control a significant association was found ( P = 0.02). Furthermore, combined spirometry and body plethysmography showed a significant association with both doctor's assessed asthma control ( P = 0.009) and the c-ACT/ACT ( P = 0.04). The addition of FeNO did not improve the results. CONCLUSIONS The combination of body plethysmography and spirometry shows best agreement with asthma control in children compared with spirometry or body plethysmography alone. Further studies are needed to find out whether additional measurements of body plethysmography improve the outcome of children in asthma monitoring.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > Unit Childrens Hospital > Forschungsgruppe Pneumologie (Pädiatrie)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gynaecology, Paediatrics and Endocrinology (DFKE) > Clinic of Paediatric Medicine > Paediatric Pneumology

UniBE Contributor:

Korten, Insa Christina Severine

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

8755-6863

Publisher:

Wiley-Blackwell

Language:

English

Submitter:

Romy Melanie Rodriguez Del Rio

Date Deposited:

24 Jan 2020 15:21

Last Modified:

24 Jan 2020 15:21

Publisher DOI:

10.1002/ppul.24320

PubMed ID:

31172686

Uncontrolled Keywords:

asthma asthma control lung function monitoring plethysmography

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.137496

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/137496

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