Association of Alterations in Intestinal Microbiota With Impaired Psychological Function in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in Remission.

Humbel, Fabienne; Rieder Harrell, Jessica; Franc, Yannick; Juillerat, Pascal; Scharl, Michael; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Schreiner, Philipp; Begré, Stefan; Rogler, Gerhard; von Känel, Roland; Yilmaz, Bahtiyar; Biedermann, Luc (2020). Association of Alterations in Intestinal Microbiota With Impaired Psychological Function in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in Remission. Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology, 18(9), 2019-2029.e11. Elsevier 10.1016/j.cgh.2019.09.022

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BACKGROUND & AIMS

Depression and anxiety are frequent comorbidities with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Alterations to the intestinal microbiome promote not only intestinal inflammation but also psychologic function. We studied the interactions between the composition of the intestinal microbiota and psychological outcomes in patients with IBD in Switzerland.

METHODS

We performed a prospective study of psychological comorbidities and quality of life (QoL) in 171 participants in the Swiss IBD Cohort Study with IBD in remission. Participants complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, the 36-Item Short Form Survey, and the IBD QoL Questionnaire. Microbes were collected from intestinal biopsies and analyzed by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing.

RESULTS

Microbiomes of patients with higher perceived stress had significantly lower alpha diversity. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with beta diversity. We found a negative correlation between psychological distress and abundance of Clostridia, Bacilli, Bacteroidia, and Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria. Psychological distress was also associated with decreases in operational taxonomic units from the lineages of Lachnospiraceae, Fusobacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae, Veillonellaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Desulfovibrionaceae, and Bacteroidaceae families. The relative abundance of Bifidobacterium in patients with Crohn's disease and Desulfovibrio in patients with ulcerative colitis correlated with depression, whereas abundance of Sutterella, RF 32, and Lactococcus correlated with quality of life in patients with Crohn's disease.

CONCLUSIONS

We identified correlations between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in patients with IBD and remission, psychological well-being, and QoL. Further studies should investigate how intestinal inflammation, the microbiome, and microbial metabolites affect psychological well-being and whether these components are mono- or bi-directionally linked.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DCR Unit Sahli Building > Forschungsgruppe Neurologie

UniBE Contributor:

Rieder Harrell, Jessica; Juillerat, Pascal; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Begré, Stefan and Yilmaz, Bahtiyar

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1542-3565

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Chantal Kottler

Date Deposited:

08 Jan 2020 10:52

Last Modified:

21 Jul 2020 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.cgh.2019.09.022

PubMed ID:

31546058

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Bacteria CD Gut–Brain Interactions Psychology

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.137740

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/137740

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