Longevity of posterior composite and compomer restorations in children placed under different types of anesthesia: a retrospective 5-year study.

Pummer, Andreas; Cieplik, Fabian; Nikolić, Milan; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried (2020). Longevity of posterior composite and compomer restorations in children placed under different types of anesthesia: a retrospective 5-year study. Clinical oral investigations, 24(1), pp. 141-150. Springer-Verlag 10.1007/s00784-019-02911-2

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OBJECTIVES The aims of this study were (i) to assess cumulative survival rates of class II resin-based composite and compomer restorations in primary molars with a 5-year observation period and (ii) to analyze the influence of different types of anesthesia and different localizations of the restorations in the teeth. METHODS Patient charts of a private practice for pediatric dentistry were screened for class II resin-based composite (Spectrum TPH3) and compomer (Dyract Posterior; both Dentsply DeTrey) restorations in primary molars with a 5-year observation period used with Adper Prompt L-Pop (3M-ESPE). One restoration per patient (age ≤ 6 years at placement) was randomly selected. RESULTS Two hundred sixty restorations were included (43% resin-based composites, 57% compomers). After 5 years, cumulative survival rates were 43% for resin-based composite and 49% for compomer restorations with no statistically significant differences. There was a tendency for higher survival rates for restorations placed under N2O inhalation sedation or general anesthesia. Distal-occlusal compomer restorations showed significantly lower survival rates (p = 0.003) as compared to mesial-occlusal compomer restorations. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of the study, we conclude that type of restorative material as well as the type of anesthesia do not influence restoration survival rates, although restorations placed in patients receiving N2O inhalation sedation or general anesthesia tend to perform better as compared with patients receiving no anesthesia or only local infiltration. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Resin-based composite and compomer restorations show similar survival rates of more than 43% (annual failure rates less than 11.5%) after 5 years for restoration of primary molars.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > Department of Periodontology
04 Faculty of Medicine > School of Dental Medicine > School of Dental Medicine, Periodontics Research

UniBE Contributor:

Schmalz, Gottfried Hans

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

1432-6981

Publisher:

Springer-Verlag

Language:

English

Submitter:

Doris Burri

Date Deposited:

22 Jan 2020 10:15

Last Modified:

22 Jan 2020 10:15

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00784-019-02911-2

PubMed ID:

31053896

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Class II Compomer Longevity Primary molars Resin-based composite Survival

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.138036

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/138036

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