Escherichia coli limits Salmonella Typhimurium infections after diet shifts and fat-mediated microbiota perturbation in mice.

Wotzka, Sandra Y; Kreuzer, Markus; Maier, Lisa; Arnoldini, Markus; Nguyen, Bidong D; Brachmann, Alexander O; Berthold, Dorothée L; Zünd, Mirjam; Hausmann, Annika; Bakkeren, Erik; Hoces, Daniel; Gül, Ersin; Beutler, Markus; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Zimmermann, Michael; Fuhrer, Tobias; Moor, Kathrin; Sauer, Uwe; Typas, Athanasios; Piel, Jörn; ... (2019). Escherichia coli limits Salmonella Typhimurium infections after diet shifts and fat-mediated microbiota perturbation in mice. Nature microbiology, 4(12), pp. 2164-2174. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41564-019-0568-5

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The microbiota confers colonization resistance, which blocks Salmonella gut colonization1. As diet affects microbiota composition, we studied whether food composition shifts enhance susceptibility to infection. Shifting mice to diets with reduced fibre or elevated fat content for 24 h boosted Salmonella Typhimurium or Escherichia coli gut colonization and plasmid transfer. Here, we studied the effect of dietary fat. Colonization resistance was restored within 48 h of return to maintenance diet. Salmonella gut colonization was also boosted by two oral doses of oleic acid or bile salts. These pathogen blooms required Salmonella's AcrAB/TolC-dependent bile resistance. Our data indicate that fat-elicited bile promoted Salmonella gut colonization. Both E. coli and Salmonella show much higher bile resistance than the microbiota. Correspondingly, competitive E. coli can be protective in the fat-challenged gut. Diet shifts and fat-elicited bile promote S. Typhimurium gut infections in mice lacking E. coli in their microbiota. This mouse model may be useful for studying pathogen-microbiota-host interactions, the protective effect of E. coli, to analyse the spread of resistance plasmids and assess the impact of food components on the infection process.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie

UniBE Contributor:

Macpherson, Andrew

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

2058-5276

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thi Thao Anh Pham

Date Deposited:

30 Jan 2020 07:30

Last Modified:

30 Jan 2020 07:30

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41564-019-0568-5

PubMed ID:

31591555

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.138145

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/138145

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