Malt1 Protease Deficiency in Mice Disrupts Immune Homeostasis at Environmental Barriers and Drives Systemic T Cell-Mediated Autoimmunity.

Martin, Kea; Touil, Ratiba; Kolb, Yeter; Cvijetic, Grozdan; Murakami, Kiichi; Israel, Laura; Duraes, Fernanda; Buffet, David; Glück, Anton; Niwa, Satoru; Bigaud, Marc; Junt, Tobias; Zamurovic, Natasa; Smith, Philip; McCoy, Kathy D.; Ohashi, Pamela S; Bornancin, Frédéric; Calzascia, Thomas (2019). Malt1 Protease Deficiency in Mice Disrupts Immune Homeostasis at Environmental Barriers and Drives Systemic T Cell-Mediated Autoimmunity. The journal of immunology, 203(11), pp. 2791-2806. American Association of Immunologists 10.4049/jimmunol.1900327

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The paracaspase Malt1 is a key regulator of canonical NF-κB activation downstream of multiple receptors in both immune and nonimmune cells. Genetic disruption of Malt1 protease function in mice and MALT1 mutations in humans results in reduced regulatory T cells and a progressive multiorgan inflammatory pathology. In this study, we evaluated the altered immune homeostasis and autoimmune disease in Malt1 protease-deficient (Malt1PD) mice and the Ags driving disease manifestations. Our data indicate that B cell activation and IgG1/IgE production is triggered by microbial and dietary Ags preferentially in lymphoid organs draining mucosal barriers, likely as a result of dysregulated mucosal immune homeostasis. Conversely, the disease was driven by a polyclonal T cell population directed against self-antigens. Characterization of the Malt1PD T cell compartment revealed expansion of T effector memory cells and concomitant loss of a CD4+ T cell population that phenotypically resembles anergic T cells. Therefore, we propose that the compromised regulatory T cell compartment in Malt1PD animals prevents the efficient maintenance of anergy and supports the progressive expansion of pathogenic, IFN-γ-producing T cells. Overall, our data revealed a crucial role of the Malt1 protease for the maintenance of intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, which might provide insights into the mechanisms underlying IPEX-related diseases associated with mutations in MALT1.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Gastro-intestinal, Liver and Lung Disorders (DMLL) > Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine > Gastroenterology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Gastroenterologie / Mukosale Immunologie

UniBE Contributor:

McCoy, Kathleen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0022-1767

Publisher:

American Association of Immunologists

Language:

English

Submitter:

Thi Thao Anh Pham

Date Deposited:

30 Jan 2020 12:55

Last Modified:

30 Jan 2020 12:55

Publisher DOI:

10.4049/jimmunol.1900327

PubMed ID:

31659015

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.138207

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/138207

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