Healthy lifestyle and life expectancy free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: prospective cohort study.

Li, Yanping; Schoufour, Josje; Wang, Dong D; Dhana, Klodian; Pan, An; Liu, Xiaoran; Song, Mingyang; Liu, Gang; Shin, Hyun Joon; Sun, Qi; Al-Shaar, Laila; Wang, Molin; Rimm, Eric B; Hertzmark, Ellen; Stampfer, Meir J; Willett, Walter C; Franco, Oscar H; Hu, Frank B (2020). Healthy lifestyle and life expectancy free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: prospective cohort study. BMJ, 368, l6669. BMJ Publishing Group 10.1136/bmj.l6669

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OBJECTIVE To examine how a healthy lifestyle is related to life expectancy that is free from major chronic diseases. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS The Nurses' Health Study (1980-2014; n=73 196) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2014; n=38 366). MAIN EXPOSURES Five low risk lifestyle factors: never smoking, body mass index 18.5-24.9, moderate to vigorous physical activity (≥30 minutes/day), moderate alcohol intake (women: 5-15 g/day; men 5-30 g/day), and a higher diet quality score (upper 40%). MAIN OUTCOME Life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. RESULTS The life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at age 50 was 23.7 years (95% confidence interval 22.6 to 24.7) for women who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors, in contrast to 34.4 years (33.1 to 35.5) for women who adopted four or five low risk factors. At age 50, the life expectancy free of any of these chronic diseases was 23.5 (22.3 to 24.7) years among men who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors and 31.1 (29.5 to 32.5) years in men who adopted four or five low risk lifestyle factors. For current male smokers who smoked heavily (≥15 cigarettes/day) or obese men and women (body mass index ≥30), their disease-free life expectancies accounted for the lowest proportion (≤75%) of total life expectancy at age 50. CONCLUSION Adherence to a healthy lifestyle at mid-life is associated with a longer life expectancy free of major chronic diseases.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM)

UniBE Contributor:

Franco Duran, Oscar Horacio

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology > 360 Social problems & social services

ISSN:

1756-1833

Publisher:

BMJ Publishing Group

Language:

English

Submitter:

Andrea Flükiger-Flückiger

Date Deposited:

15 Jan 2020 17:10

Last Modified:

04 Feb 2020 16:22

Publisher DOI:

10.1136/bmj.l6669

PubMed ID:

31915124

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.138787

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/138787

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