Complicating notions of violence: An embodied view on violence against women in Honduras

Jokela-Pansini, Maaret (2020). Complicating notions of violence: An embodied view on violence against women in Honduras. Environment and Planning. C, Politics and space, 38(5), pp. 848-865. Sage 10.1177/2399654420906833

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Feminist geographic analysis has demonstrated that violence inflicted on women is embodied, experienced and personal and at the same time, linked to global socio-political and economic processes and patriarchal norms. Consequently, violence is a complex system instead of a norm located in certain places. In heavily militarised societies, patriarchal power regimes are even more prevalent because states’ security strategies promote a masculinist understanding of protection as to who should be protected and by whom – and from what. This study draws on feminist geopolitical analysis and explores how feminist activists in Honduras experience and resist violence in their everyday lives. The research is grounded in interviews, focus-group discussions and participant observation with Honduran activists. The findings demonstrate that violence and its effects are first embedded in women’s everyday lives through feelings of fear and unsafety on the streets, at the workplace and at home. Second, violence operates through structures and institutions such as the military and police, impunity for violence against women and the juridical restriction of reproductive rights. Third, the internationally financed war on drugs and ‘development’ projects contribute to violence, thus, there is a link between intimate experiences of violence and global economic and military powers that sustain violence. Activists therefore argue that, for their needs, the state’s and international organisations’ security approaches are inadequate. The paper weaves together feminist visions of collective self-care and discusses activists’ strategies against violence. This study contributes to a growing feminist geographic scholarship linking women’s bodily experiences with violence and responds to calls for complicating notions of violence.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Human Geography > Unit Cultural Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography > Human Geography
08 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography

UniBE Contributor:

Jokela-Pansini, Maaret

Subjects:

300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
900 History > 910 Geography & travel

ISSN:

2399-6544

Publisher:

Sage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Maaret Jokela-Pansini

Date Deposited:

06 Mar 2020 13:38

Last Modified:

09 Aug 2020 02:37

Publisher DOI:

10.1177/2399654420906833

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.140558

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/140558

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