In situ cardiac performance of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at cold temperatures: long-term acclimation, acute thermal challenge and the role of adrenaline

Lurman, Glenn J; Petersen, Lene H; Gamperl, A Kurt (2012). In situ cardiac performance of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at cold temperatures: long-term acclimation, acute thermal challenge and the role of adrenaline. Journal of Experimental Biology, 215(Pt 22), pp. 4006-4014. Cambridge: Company of Biologists 10.1242/jeb.069849

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The resting and maximum in situ cardiac performance of Newfoundland Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) acclimated to 10, 4 and 0°C were measured at their respective acclimation temperatures, and when acutely exposed to temperature changes: i.e. hearts from 10°C fish cooled to 4°C, and hearts from 4°C fish measured at 10 and 0°C. Intrinsic heart rate (f(H)) decreased from 41 beats min(-1) at 10°C to 33 beats min(-1) at 4°C and 25 beats min(-1) at 0°C. However, this degree of thermal dependency was not reflected in maximal cardiac output (Q(max) values were ~44, ~37 and ~34 ml min(-1) kg(-1) at 10, 4 and 0°C, respectively). Further, cardiac scope showed a slight positive compensation between 4 and 0°C (Q(10)=1.7), and full, if not a slight over compensation between 10 and 4°C (Q(10)=0.9). The maximal performance of hearts exposed to an acute decrease in temperature (i.e. from 10 to 4°C and 4 to 0°C) was comparable to that measured for hearts from 4°C- and 0°C-acclimated fish, respectively. In contrast, 4°C-acclimated hearts significantly out-performed 10°C-acclimated hearts when tested at a common temperature of 10°C (in terms of both Q(max) and power output). Only minimal differences in cardiac function were seen between hearts stimulated with basal (5 nmol l(-1)) versus maximal (200 nmol l(-1)) levels of adrenaline, the effects of which were not temperature dependent. These results: (1) show that maximum performance of the isolated cod heart is not compromised by exposure to cold temperatures; and (2) support data from other studies, which show that, in contrast to salmonids, cod cardiac performance/myocardial contractility is not dependent upon humoral adrenergic stimulation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > Institute of Anatomy > Functional Anatomy

UniBE Contributor:

Lurman, Glenn

ISSN:

0022-0949

Publisher:

Company of Biologists

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:35

Last Modified:

03 Sep 2015 14:57

Publisher DOI:

10.1242/jeb.069849

PubMed ID:

22899537

Web of Science ID:

000310525700020

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14072 (FactScience: 220876)

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