Expression of antagonists of WNT and BMP signaling after non-rigid fixation of osteotomies

Montjovent, Marc-Oliver; Siegrist, Mark; Klenke, Frank M; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Wilhelm (2013). Expression of antagonists of WNT and BMP signaling after non-rigid fixation of osteotomies. Bone, 53(1), pp. 79-86. New York, N.Y.: Elsevier 10.1016/j.bone.2012.11.027

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Delayed fracture healing and non-unions represent rare but severe complications in orthopedic surgery. Further knowledge on the mechanisms of the bone repair process and of the development of a pseudoarthrosis is essential to predict and prevent impaired healing of fractures. The present study aimed at elucidating differences in gene expression during the repair of rigidly and non-rigidly fixed osteotomies. For this purpose, the MouseFix™ and the FlexiPlate™ systems (AO Development Institute, Davos, CH), allowing the creation of well defined osteotomies in mouse femora, were employed. A time course following the healing process of the osteotomy was performed and bones and periimplant tissues were analyzed by high-resolution X-ray, MicroCT and by histology. For the assessment of gene expression, Low Density Arrays (LDA) were done. In animals with rigid fixation, X-ray and MicroCT revealed healing of the osteotomy within 3 weeks. Using the FlexiPlate™ system, the osteotomy was still visible by X-ray after 3 weeks and a stabilizing cartilaginous callus was formed. After 4.5 weeks, the callus was remodeled and the osteotomy was, on a histological level, healed. Gene expression studies revealed levels of transcripts encoding proteins associated with inflammatory processes not to be altered in tissues from bones with rigid and non-rigid fixation, respectively. Levels of transcripts encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix and essential for bone cell functions were not increased in the rigidly fixed group when compared to controls without osteotomy. In the FlexiPlate™ group, levels of transcripts encoding the same set of genes were significantly increased 3 weeks after surgery. Expression of transcripts encoding BMPs and BMP antagonists was increased after 3 weeks in repair tissues from bones fixed with FlexiPlate™, as were inhibitors of the WNT signaling pathways. Little changes only were detected in transcript levels of tissues from rigidly fixed bones. The data of the present study suggest that rigid fixation enables accelerated healing of an experimental osteotomy as compared to non-rigid fixation. The changes in the healing process after non-rigid fixation are accompanied by an increase in the levels of transcripts encoding inhibitors of osteogenic pathways and, probably as a consequence, by temporal changes in bone matrix synthesis.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Knochenbiologie & Orthopädische Forschung

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Orthopaedic, Plastic and Hand Surgery (DOPH) > Clinic of Orthopaedic Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Orthopädische Chirurgie
04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR) > DBMR Forschung Mu35 > Forschungsgruppe Orthopädische Chirurgie

04 Faculty of Medicine > Pre-clinic Human Medicine > BioMedical Research (DBMR)

UniBE Contributor:

Montjovent, Marc-Oliver; Siegrist, Mark; Klenke, Frank M.; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Dolder, Silvia and Hofstetter, Wilhelm

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

8756-3282

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:35

Last Modified:

18 Aug 2014 14:34

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.bone.2012.11.027

PubMed ID:

23207801

Web of Science ID:

000314257100012

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14158 (FactScience: 221012)

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback