Increased response to sequential infections of honeybee, Apis mellifera scutellata, colonies by socially parasitic Cape honeybee, A. m. capensis, workers

Neumann, Peter; Pirk, Christian W. W. (2019). Increased response to sequential infections of honeybee, Apis mellifera scutellata, colonies by socially parasitic Cape honeybee, A. m. capensis, workers. Scientific reports, 9(1), p. 7582. Springer Nature 10.1038/s41598-019-43920-1

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Cape honeybee, Apis mellifera capensis, workers can be social parasites and host colonies can defend themselves by rejection of such workers. Using the pseudo-clonal obligate parasitic lineage of A. m. capensis and wild-type A. m. capensis workers, which are facultative parasites, we show that host colonies significantly increase their defence behaviour towards social parasites upon secondary exposure. Most obligate and facultative social parasites were rejected before they could even produce significant amounts of the queen-like mandibular gland pheromone secretion or activate their ovaries. This suggests that other signals, like cuticular hydrocarbons, could be used by host colonies to identify potential invaders. Honeybee colonies seem to be able to utilise these potential cues, learn from their initial exposure to hive intruders and enable them to improve their defensive behaviour during subsequent infestations, resulting in increased removal rates of parasites.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health (DCR-VPH) > Institute of Bee Health

UniBE Contributor:

Neumann, Peter

Subjects:

500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
600 Technology > 630 Agriculture

ISSN:

2045-2322

Publisher:

Springer Nature

Language:

English

Submitter:

Anna Papach

Date Deposited:

27 Mar 2020 10:22

Last Modified:

29 Mar 2020 03:43

Publisher DOI:

10.1038/s41598-019-43920-1

PubMed ID:

31110261

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.142078

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/142078

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