Increased S-100 B levels are associated with fractures and soft tissue injury in multiple trauma patients.

Müller, Martin; Münster, Julia M; Hautz, Wolf E.; Gerber, Joël L; Schefold, Joerg C.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.; Pfortmueller, Carmen A. (2020). Increased S-100 B levels are associated with fractures and soft tissue injury in multiple trauma patients. Injury - international journal of the care of the injured, 51(4), pp. 812-818. Elsevier 10.1016/j.injury.2020.03.012

[img]
Preview
Text
2020 - Müller - Injury - PMID 32192718 .pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works (CC-BY-NC-ND).

Download (520kB) | Preview

BACKGROUND S-100 B protein was identified as a biomarker for traumatic brain injury, but studies suggest that extracranial injuries may also lead to increased S-100 B serum levels. In this study, we aim to quantify the impact of injury patterns on S-100 B levels in patients with suspected multiple trauma. METHODS Patients with suspected multiple trauma treated at a Level 1 Trauma centre in Switzerland were included in this retrospective patient chart review. Extent of injuries and severity was assessed and S-100 B levels on admission measured. Potential predictors of increased S-100 B levels (>0.2 µg/L) were identified through uni- and multivariable analyses. RESULTS In total, 1,338 patients with suspected multiple trauma were included. Multivariable logistic regression showed a significant association with increased S-100 B levels in long bone fracture (OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.3-4.1, p = 0.004), non-long bone fracture (OR 3.0, 95% CI: 2.2-4.3, p<0.001), thoracic injury (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.6-4.2, p<0.001), and deep tissue injury/wounds (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.4-2.6, p<0.001). Head trauma with intracerebral bleeding was only weakly associated (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.5, p = 0.01) and head trauma without intracranial bleeding was not associated with an increased S-100 B protein level (p = 0.71). Trauma severity was also related to increased S-100 B levels (OR per ISS: 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1, p<0.001). S-100 B levels <0.57 µg/L had a high diagnostic value to rule out in-hospital mortality (negative predictive value: 1.0, 95% CI: 0.98-1.00). CONCLUSION Fractures and thoracic injuries appeared as main factors associated with increased S-100 B levels. Head injury may only play a minor role in S-100 B protein elevation in multiple trauma patients. A normal S-100 B has a good negative predictive value for in-hospital mortality. S100-B levels were associated with trauma severity and might thus be of use as a prognostic marker in trauma patients.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > University Emergency Center
04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology (DINA) > Clinic of Intensive Care

UniBE Contributor:

Müller, Martin; Hautz, Wolf; Schefold, Jörg Christian; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis and Pfortmüller, Carmen

Subjects:

600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health

ISSN:

0020-1383

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Mirella Aeberhard

Date Deposited:

27 Mar 2020 10:36

Last Modified:

12 May 2020 01:33

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.injury.2020.03.012

PubMed ID:

32192718

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Biomarker Diagnosis Fractures Multiple trauma S100 B

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.142269

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/142269

Actions (login required)

Edit item Edit item
Provide Feedback