The genomic Echinococcus microsatellite EmsB sequences: from a molecular marker to the epidemiological tool

Knapp, J.; Bart, J.M.; Maillard, S.; Gottstein, B.; Piarroux, R. (2010). The genomic Echinococcus microsatellite EmsB sequences: from a molecular marker to the epidemiological tool. Parasitology, 137(3), pp. 439-49. London: Cambridge University Press 10.1017/S0031182009991612

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In the field of molecular and epidemiological parasitology, characterization of fast evolving genetic markers appears as an important challenge to consider the diversity and genetic structure of parasites. The study of respective populations can help us to understand their adaptive strategies to survive and perpetuate the species within different host populations, all trying to resist infection. In the past, the relative monomorphic features of Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis and a severe human parasitic disease, did not stimulate studies dealing with the genetic variability of Echinococcus species or respective populations. A recently developed, characterized and validated original multilocus microsatellite, named EmsB, tandemly repeated in the genome, offered an additional opportunity for this line of investigation. We have compiled in this review new insights brought by this molecular tracker on the transmission activity of Echinococcus among different hosts and at different geographical scales.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

05 Veterinary Medicine > Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathobiology (DIP) > Institute of Parasitology

UniBE Contributor:

Gottstein, Bruno

ISSN:

0031-1820

Publisher:

Cambridge University Press

Language:

English

Submitter:

Factscience Import

Date Deposited:

04 Oct 2013 14:36

Last Modified:

23 Jul 2018 11:55

Publisher DOI:

10.1017/S0031182009991612

PubMed ID:

20025824

Web of Science ID:

000276440600010

BORIS DOI:

10.7892/boris.14293

URI:

https://boris.unibe.ch/id/eprint/14293 (FactScience: 221188)

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